Tuesday, August 8, 2023

GOOD OLD 60'S PART 2 CONT..................

 

Well .......i thought i would give you this blog in parts.... .....why you may ask .....well...... mostly  laziness   .......cutting and  pasting........ and  it  takes  time to do it in one hit .........dragging down the page .....etc .......etc ......and my attention span is  that of  a dung fly .....hence  the  blog in parts .......and if you like the first part ........ you will read the second part ....or not  .....your choice ..........


41. Kodak Carousel Slide Projector

Made By: Kodak
Avg. Cost: $300-$500*
Est. Value Today: $50-$100*

The Kodak Carousel Slide Projector was a popular choice for families and businesses in the 60s to display their slideshows. It used a round tray to hold the slides, which would advance to the next slide when the user pressed a button. The projector would then shine a light through the slide and onto a screen or wall, allowing the audience to view the image.

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However, with the advent of digital technology, slide projectors have become obsolete and can now only be found at antique stores or online marketplaces. Many people have converted their old slides into digital formats, making it easier to store and share their memories.

42. Floppy Disk Drive

Made By: IBM, Apple, and other computer manufacturers
Avg. Cost: $100-$300*
Est. Value Today: $1,000-$50,300*

Floppy disk drives were a popular storage device in the 60s and were commonly used to store and transfer data on computers. These drives used floppy disks, which were thin, flexible disks coated with a magnetic material that could store data. Floppy disk drives were an improvement on earlier storage methods, such as punched cards and cassette tapes, as they offered a larger storage capacity and were more durable.

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However, with the advancement of technology, floppy disk drives have become obsolete and have been replaced by newer storage devices such as USB drives and cloud storage. While floppy disk drives may have been a staple in the 60s, they are now a rare and nostalgicically-valued item for collectors.

43. Flower-flavored PEZ

Made By: PEZ Candy, Inc.
Avg. Cost: $0.25*
Est. Value Today: $50-$100*

PEZ, the iconic candy dispenser that has been around since the 1950s, has released a variety of flavors over the years. While the most popular flavors are still fruit-based, PEZ has also dabbled in more unusual flavors such as coffee and chocolate. One flavor that seems to have disappeared, however, is flower-flavored PEZ.

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Released in the 1960s, flower-flavored PEZ was marketed towards adults as a more sophisticated alternative to the fruit flavors that were popular with children. The flavors included rose, violet, and daisy, and were meant to be a refreshing change from the traditional flavors. While it’s unclear how successful flower-flavored PEZ was at the time, it doesn’t seem to have stood the test of time and can no longer be found on store shelves.

44. Telex Machines

Made By: Western Union, ITT
Avg. Cost: $5,000-$10,000*
Est. Value Today: $100-$500*

Telex machines were a popular means of communication in the 60s, particularly for businesses. These machines allowed for the transmission of typed messages over a network of telex machines. The messages were sent in the form of coded signals, which were then decoded by the receiving machine. The telex machine was considered to be an important tool for communication and was widely used by businesses, government agencies, and news organizations.

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Telex Machines ©Flominator / Wikimedia CommonsTelex Machines ©Flominator / Wikimedia Commons
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However, with the advent of fax machines and email in the 1970s, the telex machine quickly became obsolete. Today, telex machines are rarely seen and are mostly found in museums or private collections.

45. Mr. Potato Head

Made By: Hasbro
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: $30*

Mr. Potato Head was first introduced in the 1950s and was an instant hit with kids and adults alike. The toy consisted of plastic body parts that could be attached to a plastic potato. Mr. Potato Head was popular in the 60s and 70s because it allowed children to use their imagination and creativity to create their own unique toy.

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Mr. Potato Head @r/electronic_cigarette / RedditMr. Potato Head @r/electronic_cigarette / Reddit
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Today, Mr. Potato Head remains a beloved toy and has even been updated for the modern age. There are now Mr. Potato Head toys that come with more body parts and accessories, as well as digital versions that can be played on devices like smartphones and tablets. While the classic Mr. Potato Head toy may not be as popular as it once was, it still has a place in the hearts of many people who remember playing with it as children.

46. Carbon Paper

Made By: Gillette, 3M
Avg. Cost: $0.10 – $0.25 per sheet*
Est. Value Today: $1 – $5 per sheet*

Carbon paper was a widely used office supply in the 60s. It was placed between sheets of paper, allowing for multiple copies to be made with just one pass through a typewriter or a manual or electric typewriter. Carbon paper was commonly used for making copies of important documents, letters, and invoices.

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However, with the advancement of copying technology, such as photocopiers and printers, the use of carbon paper decreased, and it has now become obsolete. Today, carbon paper is hard to find and is mostly used by collectors or as a nostalgia item.

47. Uno Cards

Made By: Mattel
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: $40*

Uno is a classic card game that has been around for decades. The objective of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all of their cards. 

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The game is easy to learn and can be played by people of all ages, making it a popular choice for family game night. Uno has remained a favorite among families and friends due to its simple rules and fast-paced gameplay.

48. KerPlunk

Made By: Milton Bradley
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: N/A

KerPlunk is a classic tabletop game that was first introduced in the 1960s. The game consists of a plastic tube with marbles suspended in the middle. Players take turns removing sticks from the bottom of the tube, causing the marbles to fall. The player who causes the fewest marbles to fall wins. 

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KerPlunk remains a popular choice for families and friends due to its easy-to-learn rules and exciting gameplay.

49. Nerf Balls

Made By: Parker Brothers
Avg. Cost: $5*
Est. Value Today: $25*

Nerf balls were first introduced in 1969 as a safe and soft alternative to traditional sports balls. The unique foam material made them safe for indoor play and helped to reduce the risk of injury from accidentally hitting objects or people. Nerf balls quickly became a popular toy for children and were used for a wide range of games and activities.

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Today, Nerf balls are still a popular toy for children and are used for a variety of games and activities. The brand has expanded to include a range of products, including Nerf guns and other toys. The unique design and fun playability of Nerf balls continue to make them a popular choice for kids and adults alike.

50. Big Wheels

Made By: Louis Marx & Co., later by Fisher Price
Avg. Cost: $20-$30*
Est. Value Today: $50-$200* (vintage, collectible models)

Big Wheels were a popular ride-on toy, designed for young children who were just learning to pedal. These toys featured a large, plastic wheel in the front and a smaller wheel in the back, allowing children to easily and smoothly ride along. The plastic body was designed to be durable and lightweight, making it easy for children to maneuver and control.

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Big Wheels @LearningLens_ /TwitterBig Wheels @LearningLens_ /Twitter
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Big Wheels were popular for their simple design, ease of use, and durability, and they remain popular among nostalgia-seekers and collectors today. Although the design of Big Wheels has changed over the years, with newer models featuring updated materials and designs, the core concept remains the same, and these toys continue to be popular with young children who enjoy riding and playing outdoors.

51. Milk Delivery

Made By: N/A
Avg. Cost: Varies by location and quantity
Est. Value Today: Varies by production company

Milk delivery was a common practice in the 60s, where milkmen would deliver fresh milk, cream, and other dairy products to households and businesses on a regular schedule. Milk delivery was a convenient way for people to get fresh milk without having to go to the store, and it was also a way for small, local dairies to distribute their products.

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However, as supermarkets and grocery stores became more prevalent and offered a wider selection of products, milk delivery became less popular. Today, milk delivery is rare and mostly only offered by small, specialty dairies.

52. VHS Rental Stores

Made By: Various
Avg. Cost: $1-$5 per rental*
Est. Value Today: N/A

VHS rental stores were a popular destination for movie lovers in the 60s. These stores, which were often independently owned, rented out VHS tapes of the latest movies and TV shows. VHS rental stores were often found in strip malls and shopping centers, and they were a popular destination for families and friends to rent movies to watch at home.

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However, as streaming services and digital downloads became more popular in the 2000s and 2010s, VHS rental stores began to close. Today, it’s rare to find a VHS rental store in operation and VHS tapes are not considered valuable.

53. Candlestick Phones

Made By: Western Electric, Stromberg-Carlson
Avg. Cost: $15-25*
Est. Value Today: $500-$1,500*

Candlestick phones were a popular phone model in the early 1900s, and remained in use through the 1960s. These phones were named for their distinctive shape, which resembled a cand stick. They featured a transmitter and receiver on the top of the “candlestick” and a handle on the base to hold the phone.

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Candlestick phones were considered to be a stylish and elegant piece of technology in their time. However, as technology advanced and newer phone models became more common, Candlestick phones began to fade into obscurity. Today, they are considered to be a vintage phone and can be found in museums and private collections.

54. Fuzzy Logic Calculators

Made By: Various
Avg. Cost: $3000-$5000*
Est. Value Today: $3000-$5000*

Fuzzy logic calculators were first introduced in the 60s as a way to perform calculations that involve uncertain or imprecise data. They work by using a set of rules to approximate the probability of an event occurring, rather than providing a definite answer. This technology was mainly used in the field of control systems, particularly in manufacturing and industrial processes.

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Although fuzzy logic calculators are not as widely used today as they were in the 60s, they are still an important tool in control systems and artificial intelligence. With the rapid development in technology, the cost has come down and are now more accessible to a broader range of industries.

55. Punch Cards

Made By: IBM
Avg. Cost: $0.25-$1*
Est. Value Today: Not valuable

Punch cards were widely used in the 60s as a way to input data into early computers. They were made of stiff paper and had rows of small rectangular holes that could be punched out to represent binary code. The punched cards were then fed into a computer, where a card reader would interpret the pattern of holes to perform calculations or retrieve stored information.

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Punch cards have been replaced by more advanced input methods, such as keyboard and mouse, but they are still remembered as an important part of computer history. Today, punch cards are mostly used for nostalgic or decorative purposes, and can sometimes be found as collectibles.

56. Record Stores

Made By: N/A
Avg. Cost: Varies by album
Est. Value Today: Varies by store and album

Record stores were a popular destination for music lovers in the 60s. These stores sold vinyl records, which were the primary format for music at the time. Record stores offered a wide selection of music, from popular chart-topping hits to niche genres. Record stores were a place where people could go to discover new music and socialize with other music fans.

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However, with the rise of digital music and streaming services, record stores have become less prevalent. Many independent record stores have closed their doors and even large chain stores have struggled to compete. While there are still some record stores in operation today, they are often considered more of a niche market catering to vinyl collectors and music enthusiasts. The value of records today can vary greatly depending on the rarity and demand for a particular album. Some rare or sought-after records can fetch high prices, while others may not be worth much at all.

57. Tiddlywinks

Made By: Various
Avg. Cost: $1-$2*
Est. Value Today: $5-$10*

Tiddlywinks was a popular game in the 60s, it is a simple game consisting of small plastic or metal disks, known as “winks,” which are flicked with a finger or thumb in order to land them on a target. Tiddlywinks was a family game and it was enjoyed by people of all ages. It was made by various manufacturers such as J. Pressman, Cadaco, and John Jaques.

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However, with the advent of electronic games and digital media, Tiddlywinks has become less popular. Today, it is mostly used as collectibles or for vintage game enthusiasts. Tiddlywinks is still played by some people and it is also enjoyed as a fun and nostalgic game.

58. Hula Hoop

Made By: Wham-O
Avg. Cost: $1-$2*
Est. Value Today: $5-$10*

Hula Hoop was a popular toy in the 60s. It is a simple toy that consists of a plastic hoop that is spun around the waist, hips or legs by twirling and gyrating the body. Hula Hoops were made by Wham-O.

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However, with the advent of electronic games and digital media, Hula Hoop has become less popular. Today, it is mostly used as collectibles or for vintage toy enthusiasts. Hula Hoop is still enjoyed by people and it is also used for fitness and exercise.

59. Wham-O Frisbee

Made By: Wham-O
Avg. Cost: $1-$2*
Est. Value Today: $5-$10*

Wham-O Frisbee was a popular toy in the 60s. It is a simple toy that consists of a plastic disc that is thrown and caught by hand. Wham-O Frisbees were made by Wham-O, the company that invented the Frisbee. The Frisbee became popular in the 60s as a toy for people to play outdoors and at the beach. Many people would spend hours throwing and catching the Frisbee with friends and family.

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However, with the advent of electronic games and digital media, Frisbee has become less popular as a toy. Today, it is mostly used as a sport, with many professional and amateur teams playing in tournaments and competitions. Frisbee is also enjoyed as a recreational activity and it is also used for fitness and exercise. Some Frisbees made in the 60s are considered collectibles, and some can be worth quite a bit of money.

60. Pogo Sticks

Made By: Various manufacturers
Avg. Cost: $10-30*
Est. Value Today: $50-$200*

Pogo sticks were a popular toy in the 60s, especially among children. These simple devices consist of a long metal pole with a footrest and a rubber tip at the bottom. The user would stand on the footrest and use their own body weight and momentum to bounce up and down on the rubber tip. Pogo sticks were considered a fun and challenging toy that required balance and coordination to use effectively.

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Today, pogo sticks are still available but they are not as popular as they once were. They are mostly used as a recreational activity and some people use it for fitness and exercise. Collectors of vintage toys may also be interested in purchasing old pogo sticks.

61. Drive-In Banks

Made By: Various manufacturers
Avg. Cost: N/A
Est. Value Today: N/A

Drive-in banks were a popular convenience in the 1960s, allowing customers to conduct banking transactions from the comfort of their own vehicles. These banks typically featured a drive-up teller window where customers could deposit checks, withdraw cash, and perform other transactions without ever having to leave their car. Drive-in banks were particularly popular among busy individuals or families with young children.

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Drive-in banks were a revolutionary concept at the time, but they have since become less common as drive-thru banking services have become more widely available at traditional brick-and-mortar banks. However, some banks still offer drive-up services, and drive-in banks can be found in some areas, especially in rural areas. Today, drive-thru service is not as much of a unique feature as it was in the 60s, as many fast food chains and other retailers also offer drive-thru service.

62. Superballs

Made By: Wham-O
Avg. Cost: $1*
Est. Value Today: $30*

Superballs are small, bouncy balls that are made of high-quality rubber. They were first introduced in 1965 and quickly became a hit among kids and adults alike. 

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The balls are known for their incredible bounce and ability to bounce incredibly high and far. Superballs come in a variety of sizes and colors and are still a popular toy today, often used for games of catch or for playing alone.

63. American Bandstand Collectors Cards

Made By: Dick Clark Productions 
Avg. Cost: $0.10-$5*
Est. Value Today: $10-$20*

If you grew up in the 1950s or 1960s, then you probably remember American Bandstand. This show was a massive hit from the time it aired in 1952 to when it was canceled in 1989. On the show, teens danced to popular music, while musicians of the day gave rousing performances.

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American Bandstand Collectors Cards © BringBackTheMemory / ebayAmerican Bandstand Collectors Cards © BringBackTheMemory / ebay
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There was a lot of merchandise attached to the show, including American Bandstand collectors’ cards featuring Dick Clark. You might have had a box of these as a kid; if you want one, you can snag a pack on eBay for $10.

64. Beehive Hair-Dos

Made By: Hair Salons 
Avg. Cost: $10*
Est. Value Today: $200*

When you look at photos from the sixties, chances are, the women in the picture have beehive hair-dos. This cone-shaped hairstyle was popularized by celebrities like Audrey Hepburn and Jackie Kennedy in the ‘60s, and that created a style wave among regular women.

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Women already loved the big hair trend, thanks to the also-popular bouffant, and the beehive lasted longer and was quicker to do. Women could even wrap their beehive in a scarf overnight, meaning it took minimal work to smooth it out and get ready in the morning. 

65. Baby-Doll Dresses

Made By: Geoffrey Beene, Rembrandt, and Other Designers 
Avg. Cost: $5-$20*
Est. Value Today: $100-$700*

The 1950s were all about voluminous, hourglass curves and how to accentuate them whilst still covering up. The ‘60s rejected that trend, instead returning to an almost childlike style. Baby-doll dresses were all the rage, worn both at night and during the day.

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These negligees are now vintage collectibles, just in case you have a desire to look like you’re fresh out of the “Cultural Decade.” On secondhand sites like Depop, Etsy, and 1stDibs, you’ll find vintage baby-doll dresses from the ‘60s for $100-$700. 

66. Jell-O Salads

Made By: Jell-O
Avg. Cost: $2-$5 to make*
Est. Value Today: $6-$10 to make**

Jell-O salads were a mainstay of 1960s cuisine, and you either loved them or hated them. These salads were made from flavored gelatin, grated carrots and other vegetables, and fruits. Other common ingredients included marshmallows, nuts, cream or cottage cheese, and pretzels.

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Jell-O jumped on this newfound popularity in the ‘60s, even introducing savory flavors of gelatin like “Celery,” “Italian Salad,” and “Mixed Vegetable.” That said, this culinary fad was just a flash in the pan, as, by 1975, Jell-O pulled these flavors from shelves as no one wanted to eat Jell-O salads anymore.

67. Speedos

Made By: Speedo
Avg. Cost: $2*
Est. Value Today: $15*

Speedos haven’t really caught on in America the way they have in Australia and Europe. Americans just aren’t feeling these teeny-tiny bottoms for men, though the 1960s seemed, for a brief time (no pun intended) that that could be changing.

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In 1956 at the Melbourne Olympic Games, Speedo sponsored the entire Australian swimming team, becoming famous when the group won eight gold medals. As a result, Speedos caught on in the 1960s for a brief time, as the Australian Olympic domination made headlines everywhere.

68. Volkswagen Vans

Made By: Volkswagen
Avg. Cost: $6,150-$6,500*
Est. Value Today: $55,000-$75,000*

The Volkswagen Van is an iconic vehicle that just screams, “It’s the sixties!” Known as the Type 2 (“Type 1” was already taken by the Beetle) or the Transporter, this VW was the preferred mode of transportation for U.S. hippies during the ‘60s.

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Volkswagen Vans @ZaraWestwood69 / PinterestVolkswagen Vans @ZaraWestwood69 / Pinterest
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The bus, therefore, became heavily-associated with the American countercultural movement. You can still find Type 2s for sale for $55,000 to $75,000, and these antique, iconic buses have impressively held their value over the years.

69. The Beatles Concerts

Made By: The Beatles 
Avg. Cost: $4.50-$6.50 per concert ticket*
Est. Value Today: $3-$10 per vintage ticket*

You’d be hard-pressed to find a person who doesn’t know who the Beatles are. The British rock band is regarded as one of the most influential bands of all time. They were a huge part of ‘60s counterculture and the recognition of pop music as an art form.

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The Beatles toured from 1960 until 1966, with tickets for their concerts priced between $4.50 and $6.50 a pop. Beatlemania, as it was known, attracted as many as 55,000 fans to a show, with tickets selling out in just seventeen minutes for their 1965 U.S. Tour.

70. Monkees Talking Hand Puppet

Made By: Mattel
Avg. Cost: $1*
Est. Value Today: $200-$300*

The Monkees formed in L.A. in the mid-sixties, and this pop rock band might not have outsold the Beatles in the ‘60s, but they still did great numbers for RCA Victor, Arista, Rhino, and Bell. The Monkees had a lot of merch, including this hand puppet.

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Monkees Talking Hand Puppet @cryptwrestling / PinterestMonkees Talking Hand Puppet @cryptwrestling / Pinterest
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Made by Mattel, this hand puppet was released in 1966, and, when you pulled a string, it talked to you. You can find original versions of these toys, which are now collectibles, for $200 to $300 on sites like Etsy.

71. Tang

Made By: General Foods 
Avg. Cost: $0.05*
Est. Value Today: $3*

Tang came out in 1957, and, by the 1960s, it was a staple of every household. This drink mix was invented by General Foods, and ads gushed that it was chosen by U.S. astronauts because it tasted great, was easy to make, and had tons of vitamins.

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Tang @fineartamerica / PinterestTang @fineartamerica / Pinterest
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Sales of Tang were very poor until NASA popularized it by allowing it on astronaut missions (though, in 2013, Buzz Aldrin did say, “Tang sucks.”) Tang is still sold today outside of the U.S., finding particular popularity in the Philippines, Brazil, and Argentina.

72. 1958/60 “Youth for Kennedy” Campaign Button

Made By: Green Duck Co. Chicago
Avg. Cost: $0*
Est. Value Today: $249*

John F. Kennedy was one of the most influential people of the twentieth century, and the politician was the 35th President until he, unfortunately, met a tragic end in 1963. At the time of his election, he was the youngest person to become president.

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The election was one of the closest in America history, and, as you can see from this button (now $249 on eBay), young voters had a lot to do with JFK’s win over Nixon. JFK’s margin over Nixon, in the end, was under 120,000 votes.

73. Giant Computers

Made By: IBM, Honeywell, UNIVAC, etc.
Avg. Cost: $20,000-$1 million* 
Est. Value Today: $20 for an IBM mainframe*

People might believe that computing began with Apple and Google, but that’s not true. Computers have been around for decades in various forms, and the ‘60s marked the transition from vacuum-tube to solid-state transistors, followed by circuit chips.

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Some examples of the giant, heavy computers from the sixties included the IBM 1401, UNIVAC 1107, NCR 315, and Honeywell Series (200-800). Computers no longer required an entire room of space in the ‘60s, but they were still hefty. 

74. Flight Attendants

Made By: United Airlines, Northwest Orient, Pan Am, etc.
Avg. Cost: $41 per ticket*
Est. Value Today: $305 per ticket*

Called stewardesses, flight attendants were a huge part of airline advertisements in the 1960s. Typically, young, unmarried, attractive women were hired as flight attendants, with the first African American woman assuming the role in 1958.

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The ‘60s were the Golden Age of Flying, as you got glamorous flight attendants, lots of legroom, great, gourmet meals, and well-dressed passengers. As you can see, the ‘60s flight experience is a far cry from today’s. 

75. Banana Bikes

Made By: Raleigh, Western Flyer, etc.
Avg. Cost: $10-$50*
Est. Value Today: $150-$400*

The banana bike was a kid’s bike designed to look like a chopper motorcycle, making whatever kid was behind the wheel feel super-cool. The banana bike had ape hanger handlebars, small wheels, and a banana seat.

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They were perfect for kids who were just learning how to ride, as they had a low center of gravity and practical step-through frame design. They were also cheap, costing anywhere from $10 to $50.

76. Somewhere Perfume

Made By: Avon 
Avg. Cost: $5*
Est. Value Today: $25*

Avon has been around since the late 1800s, and this multinational company brings in $9.1 billion in sales every year. The skincare and cosmetics company had its heyday in the sixties, and its saleswomen and men saw perfumes become some of their most popular products.

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Avon perfumes were characterized by their beautiful, almost art-like containers. Somewhere by Avon, a women’s perfume, came in pretty, uniquely-shaped glass jars that housed a flowery, potent scent. 

77. Mister Rogers

Made By: Fred Rogers, NET (Later PBS)
Avg. Cost: $6,000 show budget*
Est. Value Today: $99 for a PBS DVD set*

Mister Rogers was an author, producer, Presbyterian minister, and American TV host known for his beloved children’s show, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. This show ran from 1968 until 2001, just a few years before the American icon passed away.

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The children’s program not only taught important educational elements, it also taught kindness, respect, and equality. The Pittsburgh-based show was broadcast NET (National Educational Television) in the sixties, and it was popular almost immediately.

78. Goody Two Shoes Doll

Made By: Ideal Toys 
Avg. Cost: $1-$5*
Est. Value Today: $249.95*

On the vintage collectibles market, this Goody Two Shoes Doll will cost you almost $250, a far cry from its much-cheaper price in the 1960s. Made by Ideal Toys, this doll was named after a British children’s story published in 1765.

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This 19” “walking doll” was one of the most popular toys for girls in the sixties, as everyone seemed to want to play with this blonde-haired, blue-clad toy. The slogan on the box read, “The doll that walks by herself!” 

79. Flatsy Dolls

Made By: Ideal Toys 
Avg. Cost: $3*
Est. Value Today: $18-$40 per lot*

Hank Kramer came up with the Flatsy Dolls, which were flat dolls produced by Ideal Toy Company from 1969 until 1973. Though they had a short run on the toy market, these dolls are now collectibles, priced at $18 to $40 per lot.

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Flatsy Dolls @Debi Rice Richter / FacebookFlatsy Dolls @Debi Rice Richter / Facebook
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Originally priced at $3, Flatsy Dolls had long hair and wore “mod” clothing, reflecting the famous style of the ‘60s. These dolls, which were made from soft vinyl and wire, always came with shoes and a dress, as well as the tagline, “She’s Flat And All That!” 

80. 1960–1964 Washington Quarters

Made By: U.S. Mint 
Avg. Cost: $0.25*
Est. Value Today: $8-$18*

While some quarters and other U.S. Mint coins are worth thousands of dollars, others have a value that is far less, though still more than their face value. Washington Quarters from 1960 to 1964 cost anywhere from $8 to $18 on the vintage resale market.

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1960–1964 Washington Quarters © Double-Matt / Shutterstock.com1960–1964 Washington Quarters © Double-Matt / Shutterstock.com




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