Tuesday, August 8, 2023

THE GOOD OLD 60'S................

 



Who did not like the  60's........ the  coolest ,,,,music/women/clothing /cars/cost of living /no social media .......etc ,......etc ........i remember these things .......well most of them anyways .....



Things From The ’60s That Could Be Worth Something Today

Lipton Onion Soup Dip ©melissamn / shutterstock.comLipton Onion Soup Dip ©melissamn / shutterstock.com

Anyone who experienced the 60s can vouch that it was a strange and exciting time in America. The Beatles were topping the charts with countless tracks from their Revolver and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band albums. The counterculture movement was in full swing, which meant hair was long, clothing was colorful and patterns were bold.

Whether you look back at the unique fashion, the start of the civil rights movement, or the political and social events that shaped the decade, the 60s didn’t miss a beat. Let’s take a trip back to the past and reminisce about the good, the bad, and the ugly of the decade most people feel nostalgic about.

Advertisement

1. Easy Bake Oven

Made By: Hasbro
Avg. Cost: $20*
Est. Value Today: $40-60*

The Easy Bake Oven was a popular toy for young children in the 1960s and 1970s. It allowed kids to bake miniature cakes and treats using a small light bulb as the heat source. The oven was marketed as a fun way to encourage kids to learn about cooking and baking. The original Easy Bake Oven came in a classic turquoise blue color and was later available in a variety of other colors and styles.

Advertisement
Easy Bake Oven @clickusa / PinterestEasy Bake Oven @clickusa / Pinterest

Despite its popularity, the Easy Bake Oven has fallen out of favor in recent years as kids’ toys and interests have shifted towards electronic devices and video games. However, the Easy Bake Oven remains a nostalgic piece of toy history and is sought after by collectors and those who remember playing with it as children.

Advertisement

2. Hot Wheels Cars

Made By: Mattel, Inc.
Avg. Cost: $1*
Est. Value Today: $12*

Hot Wheels cars were first introduced in 1968 and quickly became a popular toy among children. The small, die-cast cars were designed to look like real-life vehicles and could be played with on their own or used in conjunction with Hot Wheels tracks and accessories. The unique design and fun playability of Hot Wheels cars made them a must-have toy for children in the 60s and 70s.

Advertisement
Hot Wheels Cars @smallcarlist / TwitterHot Wheels Cars @smallcarlist / Twitter

Today, Hot Wheels cars are still a popular toy among children and collectors. The brand has expanded to include a wide range of vehicles and accessories, and new collections are released regularly. The enduring popularity of Hot Wheels cars can be attributed to the high level of detail and quality, as well as the fun and creative play opportunities they offer.

3. Barbie Dream House

Made By: Mattel Inc.
Avg. Cost: $100*
Est. Value Today: N/A

The Barbie Dream House was a popular toy for girls in the 1960s and beyond. It was a three-story playhouse designed to look like a modern home and was marketed as a dream home for Barbie dolls. The house was designed with multiple rooms and furniture, allowing girls to use their imaginations and play out various scenarios and stories with their dolls.

Advertisement
Barbie Dream House @Deez Cabbies, Dolls, and Toys / YouTubeBarbie Dream House @Deez Cabbies, Dolls, and Toys / YouTube
Advertisement

Over the years, the Barbie Dream House has undergone several redesigns and updates to keep up with changing trends and styles, but it remains a popular toy for young girls. The Barbie Dream House continues to inspire creativity and imagination in young girls, and is now a staple of many childhood memories.

4. Chatty Cathy

Made By: Mattel
Avg. Cost: $25-$50*
Est. Value Today: $300-$1,500*

Chatty Cathy is a series of talking dolls that were introduced in the 60s. These dolls are characterized by their ability to speak a variety of phrases when a button on their stomach is pressed.

Advertisement
Chatty Cathy @baiernikolich/PinterestChatty Cathy @baiernikolich/Pinterest
Advertisement

Chatty Cathy dolls were a popular choice for children in the 60s and 70s, and they enjoyed a resurgence of popularity in the 90s. While they might not be as popular as they once were, Chatty Cathy dolls are still a beloved and iconic toy for many people.

5. Silly Putty

Made By: Binney & Smith, Inc.
Avg. Cost: $1
Est. Value Today: $25+

Silly Putty was first introduced in 1950 as a children’s toy and quickly became a popular item in the 1960s. The squishy, bouncy material was fun to play with and could be molded into different shapes and designs. Silly Putty was also known for its ability to pick up and transfer images from comic strips and newspaper print, making it a fun and interactive toy for kids.

Advertisement
Silly Putty @buzzfeed / PinterestSilly Putty @buzzfeed / Pinterest
Advertisement

Today, Silly Putty is still available and remains a popular toy for children. However, it has faced increased competition from other types of putty and squishy toys. Despite this, the unique properties of Silly Putty and its nostalgic appeal continue to make it a popular choice for kids and adults alike.

6. Fizzies

Made By: The Fizzies Company
Avg. Cost: $0.25-$0.50*
Est. Value Today: $70-$100*

Fizzies were a popular drink mix in the 60s that were designed to be mixed with water to create a flavored and carbonated drink. These drink mixes were available in a variety of flavors, including cherry, lemon-lime, and root beer.

Advertisement
Fizzies @Nostalgia and Memories/FacebookFizzies @Nostalgia and Memories/Facebook
Advertisement

Fizzies were marketed as a healthy alternative to soda and were often used as a way to help children stay hydrated. While they might not be as popular as they once were, Fizzies are still a beloved and iconic drink mix for many people.

7. Celery-Flavored Jell-O

Made By: Jell-O
Avg. Cost: $0.50-$1.00*
Est. Value Today:  $50*

Celery-flavored Jell-O may sound like an unusual and questionable flavor choice, but in the 60s, it was a popular choice for many people. This Jell-O flavor was likely chosen as a way to incorporate more vegetables into desserts, as Jell-O was often seen as a healthier alternative to other sweets.

Advertisement
Celery-Flavored Jell-O @WorthPoint/PinterestCelery-Flavored Jell-O @WorthPoint/Pinterest
Advertisement

Unfortunately, celery-flavored Jell-O did not catch on in the same way as other Jell-O flavors, and it is now a rare and hard-to-find flavor. While it may not be as popular as other Jell-O flavors, celery-flavored Jell-O remains a unique and iconic part of the Jell-O brand’s history.

8. Stretch Armstrong

Made By: Kenner Products
Avg. Cost: $10-$15*
Est. Value Today: $100-$200* (vintage, unopened)

Stretch Armstrong was a popular toy, known for its ability to stretch and bounce back to its original shape. Made of a stretchy, jelly-like substance enclosed in a plastic frame, this toy allowed children to use their imagination and engage in imaginative play. Children could stretch it as far as they could, and it would always bounce back to its original shape.

Advertisement
Stretch Armstrong ©Alex Beattie / Wikimedia CommonsStretch Armstrong ©Alex Beattie / Wikimedia Commons
Advertisement

Despite its popularity, Stretch Armstrong’s success was short-lived. However, the toy has since been re-released and remains popular among nostalgia-seekers and collectors. Newer versions of the toy feature updated materials and designs, but its classic stretchy, jelly-like substance remains a beloved feature for those who remember playing with it as children.

9. Fisher Price Little People

Made By: Fisher Price
Avg. Cost: $2-$5*
Est. Value Today: $10-$50* (vintage sets)

Fisher Price Little People was a popular toy line in the 1950s-1960s, featuring a small cast of plastic figures and playsets that encouraged imaginative play. Designed for young children, these toys were meant to help develop their fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination. The Little People figures were easy to grasp and hold, and the playsets were designed to be simple and straightforward, making them ideal for young children who were just starting to play with toys.

Advertisement
Fisher Price Little People @popscreen / PinterestFisher Price Little People @popscreen / Pinterest
Advertisement

Despite their simple design, Fisher Price Little People toys were popular for many decades, and they remain popular today, both with collectors and with young children who enjoy imaginative play. The line has been updated over the years, with new playsets and figures being introduced, but the core design remains the same, and the toys continue to be popular among young children.

10. Moon Boots

Made By: Tecnica
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: $145*

The Moon Boot has become an iconic fashion staple from the 1960s, with their modern look and quirky style. They were created by the Italian brand Tecnica and quickly became popular around the world for their durability and space-inspired design.

Advertisement
Moon Shoes @u/ILoveTheDarknessBand / RedditMoon Shoes @u/ILoveTheDarknessBand / Reddit
Advertisement

The original designs featured an inflatable ankle-high nylon upper with a lightweight EVA foam sole and non-slip rubber traction on the sole for comfort and durability.

11. Rolodex

Made By: Rolodex Corporation
Avg. Cost: $20-$50*
Est. Value Today: $50-$100*

The Rolodex was a popular tool for organizing contacts in the 60s. It was a rotating file that held cards with contact information, such as names, addresses, and phone numbers. The Rolodex was widely used by businesses, salespeople, and professionals to keep track of their contacts.

Advertisement
Rolodex @BrentonBrian /TwitterRolodex @BrentonBrian /Twitter
Advertisement

However, with the advent of personal computers and electronic organizers in the 80s and 90s, the Rolodex became less popular. Today, most people store their contacts digitally on their computers, smartphones, or cloud-based systems. While the Rolodex may seem outdated and cumbersome compared to modern technology, it was a revolutionary tool in its time and played an important role in helping people stay organized and connected. Despite being phased out by newer technologies, the Rolodex remains a fondly remembered and nostalgic piece of office equipment.

12. Army Men Play Set

Made By: Various manufacturers
Avg. Cost: $10-$20*
Est. Value Today: $10-$30*

Army Men play sets were a popular toy for boys in the 60s. The sets consisted of plastic army soldiers and accessories, such as weapons and vehicles, that could be used to stage battles and reenact military scenarios. Army men play sets appealed to young boys’ love of adventure and their imaginative play, allowing them to create their own stories and engage in creative play.

Advertisement
Army Men Play Set @csecundus / PinterestArmy Men Play Set @csecundus / Pinterest
Advertisement

Although army men play sets are not as popular today, they are still widely available and can be found in most toy stores.

13. Ken Doll

Made By: Mattel
Avg. Cost: $10*
Est. Value Today: N/A

Ken Doll is a popular male fashion doll introduced by Mattel in 1961 as the boyfriend of the iconic Barbie Doll. Over the years, Ken Doll has become a cultural icon and is recognized all over the world as one of the most famous male dolls ever made. Ken Doll has undergone numerous transformations to keep up with changing fashion and cultural trends, and he has been released in a variety of ethnicities, professions, and outfits.

Advertisement
Ken Doll @Melsretrospot / EtsyKen Doll @Melsretrospot / Etsy
Advertisement

While Ken Doll has always been popular among young girls and collectors, his popularity has waned in recent years as more diverse and inclusive toy options have become available. Nevertheless, he remains a beloved and iconic toy, and is still widely recognized and remembered as an important part of toy history. 

14. Suzy Homemaker

Made By: Various manufacturers
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: N/A

Suzy Homemaker was a popular toy line that was marketed to young girls in the 1960s and 1970s. The toy line included miniature kitchen appliances, such as a stove, oven, refrigerator, and sink, as well as play food and utensils. The goal of Suzy Homemaker was to encourage young girls to play and imagine themselves in traditional domestic roles.

Advertisement
Suzy Homemaker @lindahubbardart /TwitterSuzy Homemaker @lindahubbardart /Twitter
Advertisement

Although the toy line was popular in its day, it has since been criticized for promoting gender stereotypes and limiting the imagination of young girls. Today, many toy companies are actively working to create toys that are more inclusive and empowering for all children, regardless of gender. 

15. Lite-Brite

Made By: Hasbro
Avg. Cost: $15*
Est. Value Today: N/A

Lite-Brite is a classic toy that was first introduced by Hasbro in 1967. The toy consists of a light box with pegs and a number of translucent plastic sheets, which can be placed over the light box to create colorful, glowing pictures. Children would insert the pegs into the holes on the sheets to create patterns and designs. The light box would then illuminate the pegs to create a glowing image.

Advertisement
Lite-Brite @retroist /TwitterLite-Brite @retroist /Twitter
Advertisement

Lite-Brite was a popular toy for kids in the 1960s and 1970s, and it remains a beloved classic today. Although the toy has gone through many changes and updates over the years, it remains a simple and engaging way for children to express their creativity and imagination.

16. Twister

Made By: Milton Bradley
Avg. Cost: $15
Est. Value Today: N/A

Twister is a classic party game that was first released in 1966 by Milton Bradley. The game consists of a large plastic mat with colored circles, and players take turns spinning a wheel to determine which hand or foot they must place on a certain color. 

Advertisement
Twister @DaisyFieldVintage / EtsyTwister @DaisyFieldVintage / Etsy
Advertisement

The objective is to not fall over or touch the mat with any other body part. Twister became popular for its combination of physical activity and strategy, making it a fun and entertaining game for all ages.

17. Etch-a-Sketch

Made By: Ohio Art
Avg. Cost: $5-$10*
Est. Value Today: $1,500*

Etch-a-Sketch is a mechanical drawing toy that was introduced in the 60s. This toy is characterized by its simple and intuitive design, which allows users to create drawings by turning two knobs.

Advertisement
Etch-a-Sketch @clickusa/PinterestEtch-a-Sketch @clickusa/Pinterest
Advertisement

Etch-a-Sketch was a popular choice for children in the 60s and 70s, and it has remained a beloved and iconic toy for many people. While it might not be as popular as it once was, Etch-a-Sketch is still a reliable and essential toy for many people.

18. China Sets

Made By: Royal Albert, Dalton, and more 
Avg. Cost: Various
Est. Value Today: $100+ for a decent set*

China sets had their moment during the 50s and 60s, but in the decades that followed they all but disappeared from view. Younger generations found them dated and they stopped becoming household staples. However, everything always comes back around. 

Advertisement
China Sets @etsy_UK / PinterestChina Sets @etsy_UK / Pinterest
Advertisement

In more recent years, there has been a boom in vintage fashion and homeware. These days, collectors are willing to pay upward of $100 for a decent china set, depending on who made it and what era it’s from.

19. Kennedy Half Dollar 

Made By: United States Mint
Avg. Cost: Half a dollar
Est. Value Today: $1295 for uncirculated coin*

There is a huge market for coins. Diehard collectors just can’t get enough of them, so it’s hardly surprising that certain rare ones go for (pardon the pun) a mint. The Kennedy Half Dollar was first introduced after JFK’s passing as a tribute to the fallen president. 

Advertisement
Kennedy Half Dollar  / etsyKennedy Half Dollar  / etsy
Advertisement

There have been many versions of the coin since then, but an uncirculated version will set you back around $1295 dollars. The currency features a side profile of Kennedy, making it particularly treasured by patriots and historians alike.

20. Record Players

Made By: Sony, Philips, RCA
Avg. Cost: $100-300*
Est. Value Today: $500-1,000*

In the 60s, music lovers had to physically purchase records and play them on a record player in order to listen to their favorite tunes. Record players were the primary way people listened to music at home, and they came in a variety of sizes and styles.

Advertisement
Record Players @Sheila Goss/FacebookRecord Players @Sheila Goss/Facebook
Advertisement

Record players had a turntable that spun the record, and a needle that traveled through the grooves of the record to play the music. The sound quality of record players varied depending on the quality of the needle and the condition of the record. Record players fell out of favor in the 70s with the rise of cassette tapes and eventually CDs, and today they are mostly used by collectors or as decorative pieces.

21. Drive-In Movie Theaters

Made By: Various
Avg. Cost: $1-5 per person*
Est. Value Today: N/A

Drive-in movie theaters were a popular form of entertainment in the 60s, where movie-goers could watch a film from the comfort of their own car. These outdoor theaters typically had a large screen and a speaker system that allowed patrons to tune in to the audio of the film on their car radio.

Advertisement
Drive-In Movie Theaters @Ted Bowers//FacebookDrive-In Movie Theaters @Ted Bowers//Facebook
Advertisement

Drive-in movie theaters were popular because they allowed people to have a more casual and relaxed viewing experience. However, as indoor multiplexes with stadium seating and digital projection became more common, drive-in theaters began to decline in popularity. Today, it’s rare to find a drive-in theater, as they have mostly been replaced by indoor movie theaters.

22. Typewriters

Made By: IBM, Smith Corona, Underwood
Avg. Cost: $100-300*
Est. Value Today: $800-$1,000*

In the 60s, typewriters were a common tool for writers, students, and office workers. These mechanical devices allowed users to type out documents by pressing keys that struck a ribbon, which in turn left ink marks on a sheet of paper. Typewriters were a reliable way to produce written documents, but they had their limitations.

Advertisement
Typewriters @Urban Legend Typewriters/FacebookTypewriters @Urban Legend Typewriters/Facebook
Advertisement

For one, they were slow to use compared to modern computers, and it was difficult to make corrections on a typed page. As computers became more affordable and widespread in the 80s, typewriters became less popular and were eventually replaced. Today, typewriters are mostly used as decorative pieces or by collectors.

23. Cassette Tapes

Made By: Sony, Philips, Maxell, TDK
Avg. Cost: $5-$10 per tape*
Est. Value Today: $5-$20 per tape*

Cassette tapes were a popular way to listen to music in the 60s and 70s. These tapes, which were about the size of a deck of cards, could hold up to an hour of music and were played on cassette tape players, which were commonly found in cars and homes. Cassette tapes allowed people to listen to their favourite music on the go and were considered a major advancement in music technology. 

Advertisement
Cassette Tapes @clickusa / PinterestCassette Tapes @clickusa / Pinterest
Advertisement

However, as CDs and later digital music formats became more popular in the 80s and 90s, cassette tapes began to fade into obscurity. Today, cassette tapes are mostly used by collectors and nostalgia enthusiasts.

24. Blockbuster Video Stores

Made By: Blockbuster LLC
Avg. Cost: $2-$5 per rental*
Est. Value Today: Closed down

Blockbuster video stores were a popular destination for movie enthusiasts in the 90s and early 2000s. These stores offered a wide selection of movies and video games for rent, and were a common destination for families and friends looking to enjoy a night in. 

Advertisement
Blockbuster Video Stores @EarlWBlair / FacebookBlockbuster Video Stores @EarlWBlair / Facebook
Advertisement

However, as streaming and online rental services like Netflix and Redbox became more popular in the late 2000s and 2010s, Blockbuster video stores began to fade into obscurity. Today, Blockbuster video stores are mostly remembered as a nostalgic part of the past.

25. RadioShack

Made By: RadioShack Corporation
Avg. Cost: $20-$100*
Est. Value Today: Closed down

RadioShack was a popular electronics retailer in the 60s, known for selling a wide variety of electronic components and gadgets, including radios, televisions, and audio equipment. The chain, which was founded in 1921, had over 7,000 stores across the United States at its peak, and was known for its knowledgeable staff and wide selection of products.

Advertisement
RadioShack @shorpy / PinterestRadioShack @shorpy / Pinterest
Advertisement

However, as technology advanced and electronics became more widely available, RadioShack struggled to keep up with the competition. The company filed for bankruptcy in 2015 and liquidated its remaining stores in 2017. Today, the RadioShack brand lives on through a small number of franchise stores, but the company is a shadow of its former self.

26. Payphones

Made By: Various manufacturers
Avg. Cost: $0.25 per call*
Est. Value Today: $5-$10 per call*

Payphones were a common sight in the 60s, found on street corners, in airports and other public places. These coin-operated phones allowed people to make calls without the need to own a phone themselves. The payphones in the 60s were typically operated by the Bell System, and operated using a coin slot, which would accept nickels, dimes, and quarters.

Advertisement
Payphones / Bettmann / Getty ImagesPayphones / Bettmann / Getty Images
Advertisement

However, as mobile phones became more prevalent, the need for payphones diminished. Today, payphones are a rarity, and many of the remaining payphones are out of service or in disrepair. The number of payphones in the United States has declined from 2.6 million in 2000 to less than 100,000 today.

27. VCRs

Made By: Sony, JVC, RCA
Avg. Cost: $300-$800*
Est. Value Today: $50-$100*

VCRs, or video cassette recorders, were a popular way to watch movies and recorded TV shows in the 60s. These devices allowed users to record and play back TV programs on VHS tapes, which were widely available at the time. VCRs revolutionized home entertainment and made it possible for people to watch movies and TV shows at their convenience.

Advertisement
VCRs @phytoplanktonH2O / PinterestVCRs @phytoplanktonH2O / Pinterest
Advertisement

However, as technology advanced and digital streaming became more popular in the 21st century, VCRs became obsolete. Today, VCRs can still be found in some homes, but they are mostly used for nostalgia or for playing old tapes.

28. Polaroid Cameras

Made By: Polaroid
Avg. Cost: $50-$100*
Est. Value Today: $200-$300*

Polaroid cameras were a popular choice for instant photography in the 60s. They used self-developing film to produce a physical print of the photo within minutes of taking it. Polaroid cameras were particularly useful for events or parties where people wanted to have a tangible keepsake of the occasion.

Advertisement
Polaroid Cameras @Ray Mills/FacebookPolaroid Cameras @Ray Mills/Facebook
Advertisement

However, with the rise of digital photography, Polaroid cameras have become less popular. Many people now prefer to take photos with their smartphones or digital cameras and share them online or through social media. While Polaroid cameras can still be found at antique stores or online marketplaces, they are not as widely used as they were in the 60s.

29. Bell-bottoms

Made By: Various brands
Avg. Cost: $20-$50*
Est. Value Today: $20-$50*

Bell-bottoms were a popular style of pants in the 60s and 70s, characterized by their flared shape at the bottom. These pants were often worn by both men and women, and they were a symbol of the counterculture and hippie movement of the time.

Advertisement
Bell-bottoms @vintageim/Pinterest | @Hedi Mos/FacebookBell-bottoms @vintageim/Pinterest | @Hedi Mos/Facebook
Advertisement

Bell-bottoms have made a few comeback attempts in recent years, but they have yet to reach the same level of popularity as they did in the 60s and 70s. While they might not be as fashionable as they once were, bell-bottoms still hold a certain nostalgia for those who remember wearing them or seeing them on others.

30. Tie-dye

Made By: Various brands
Avg. Cost: $20-$50*
Est. Value Today: $20-$50*

Tie-dye was a popular fashion trend in the 60s and 70s, characterized by brightly colored, swirling patterns on clothing and other items. This trend was often associated with the counterculture and hippie movement of the time, and it was a way for people to express their individuality and creativity through fashion.

Advertisement
Tie-dye @dharmatrading/@clickusa/PinterestTie-dye @dharmatrading/@clickusa/Pinterest
Advertisement

Tie-dye has made a few comeback attempts in recent years, but it has yet to reach the same level of popularity as it did in the 60s and 70s. While it might not be as fashionable as it once was, tie-dye still holds a certain nostalgia for those who remember wearing it or seeing it on others.

31. Lava Lamps

Made By: Mathmos
Avg. Cost: $50-$100*
Est. Value Today: $100-$200*

Lava lamps were a popular decorative item in the 60s and 70s, characterized by their unique, mesmerizing design. These lamps consist of a glass container filled with a colored liquid and a light bulb, which causes the liquid to heat up and form strange, swirling patterns.

Advertisement
Lava Lamps @mathmos/PinterestLava Lamps @mathmos/Pinterest
Advertisement

Lava lamps were often used as a source of ambient lighting in a room, and they were a popular choice for those looking to add a touch of whimsy to their decor. While they might not be as popular as they once were, lava lamps still hold a certain nostalgia for those who remember owning one or seeing them in someone else’s home.

32. Miniskirts

Made By: Various brands
Avg. Cost: $20-$50*
Est. Value Today: $20-$50*

Miniskirts were a popular fashion trend in the 60s, characterized by their short length and playful, youthful style. These skirts were often worn by women as a way to express their independence and liberation, and they were a symbol of the counterculture and youth movement of the time.

Advertisement
Miniskirts @Sock Hops and Doo-Wops/FacebookMiniskirts @Sock Hops and Doo-Wops/Facebook
Advertisement

Miniskirts have remained a popular fashion item in the decades since their introduction, though they have undergone various modifications and updates. While they might not be as controversial as they once were, miniskirts still hold a certain nostalgia for those who remember wearing them or seeing them on others in the 60s.

33. Go-Go Boots

Made By: Various brands
Avg. Cost: $50-$100*
Est. Value Today: $400-$500*

Go-go boots were a popular fashion item in the 60s, characterized by their knee-high length and pointed toe. These boots were often worn by women as a way to add a touch of glamour and sexiness to their outfits, and they were a staple of the go-go dance scene of the time.

Advertisement
Go-Go Boots @Laura House/FacebbokGo-Go Boots @Laura House/Facebbok
Advertisement

Go-go boots have made a few comeback attempts in recent years, but they have yet to reach the same level of popularity as they did in the 60s. While they might not be as fashionable as they once were, go-go boots still hold a certain nostalgia for those who remember wearing them or seeing them on others.

34. Barbie Dolls

Made By: Mattel
Avg. Cost: $5-$10*
Est. Value Today: $50-$1,000* (for vintage models)

Barbie dolls were a popular toy in the 60s, and they have remained a beloved and iconic toy in the decades since their introduction. These dolls, which are designed to represent an adult woman, have been released in a variety of different styles and professions over the years, including everything from fashion models and ballerinas to doctors and astronauts.

Advertisement
Barbie Dolls @Hippies from the '60s and '70s/FacebookBarbie Dolls @Hippies from the '60s and '70s/Facebook
Advertisement

Barbie dolls have faced criticism over the years for promoting unrealistic beauty standards and perpetuating gender stereotypes, but they have also been celebrated for breaking boundaries and providing young girls with role models and aspirations. While they might not be as popular as they once were, Barbie dolls still hold a special place in the hearts of those who grew up playing with them.

35. GI Joe Dolls

Made By: Hasbro
Avg. Cost: $5-$10*
Est. Value Today: $100-$250* (for vintage models)

GI Joe dolls were a popular toy in the 60s, and they have remained a beloved and iconic toy in the decades since their introduction. These dolls, which are designed to represent adult male soldiers, have been released in a variety of different styles and professions over the years, including everything from infantrymen and pilots to doctors and astronauts.

Advertisement
GI Joe Dolls @Center for the Importance of Play/FacebookGI Joe Dolls @Center for the Importance of Play/Facebook
Advertisement

GI Joe dolls have faced criticism over the years for promoting militaristic and aggressive themes, but they have also been celebrated for providing young boys with role models and aspirations. While they might not be as popular as they once were, GI Joe dolls still hold a special place in the hearts of those who grew up playing with them.

36. Sunbeam Mixmaster

Made By: Sunbeam
Avg. Cost: $40-$80*
Est. Value Today: $100-$200*

The Sunbeam Mixmaster is a series of electric stand mixers that were introduced in the 60s. These mixers are characterized by their powerful motors and multiple attachments, which allow them to perform a variety of tasks, including mixing, beating, and whipping.

Advertisement
Sunbeam Mixmaster @Robin Weingarten/FacebookSunbeam Mixmaster @Robin Weingarten/Facebook
Advertisement

Sunbeam Mixmasters were a popular choice for home cooks and bakers in the 60s and 70s, and they have remained a staple in kitchens around the world. While they might not be as popular as they once were, Sunbeam Mixmasters are still a reliable and essential tool for many people.

37. Pifco Princess

Made By: Pifco
Avg. Cost: $50-$100*
Est. Value Today: $80-$100*

The Pifco Princess is a series of electric hair rollers that were introduced in the 60s. These rollers are characterized by their lightweight and portable design, which makes them easy to use at home or on the go.

Advertisement
Pifco Princess @ebaycouk/PinterestPifco Princess @ebaycouk/Pinterest
Advertisement

Pifco Princess hair rollers were a popular choice for women in the 60s and 70s, as they allowed them to create a variety of hairstyles with minimal effort. While they might not be as popular as they once were, Pifco Princess hair rollers are still a reliable and essential tool for many people.

38. Rotary Dial Phones

Made By: Western Electric, AT&T
Avg. Cost: $30-50*
Est. Value Today: $200-$2,000*

Rotary dial phones were a staple in every household in the 60s. These clunky, analog devices allowed people to make phone calls by dialing a series of numbers on a circular dial. The rotary dial worked by interrupting the phone line’s electrical current as the user turned the dial, which sent a series of pulses to the phone company’s central office.

Advertisement
Rotary Dial Phones @etsy/PinterestRotary Dial Phones @etsy/PinterestRotary Dial Phones @etsy/PinterestRotary Dial Phones @etsy/Pinterest
Advertisement

While rotary dial phones might seem ancient by today’s standards, they were actually considered high-tech in their time. However, as technology advanced and touch-tone phones became more common in the 70s, rotary dial phones began to fade into obscurity. Today, it’s rare to find a rotary dial phone in anyone’s home, and they’re mostly used as decorative pieces or conversation starters.

39. Conair Curling Iron

Made By: Conair
Avg. Cost: $20-$50*
Est. Value Today: $60-$100*

The Conair Curling Iron is a series of electric curling irons that were introduced in the 60s. These irons are characterized by their adjustable heat settings and multiple barrel sizes, which allow them to create a variety of curls and waves.

Advertisement
Conair Curling Iron ©ceriamiatoe/ebayConair Curling Iron ©ceriamiatoe/ebay
Advertisement

Conair Curling Irons were a popular choice for women in the 60s and 70s, as they allowed them to create a variety of hairstyles with minimal effort. While they might not be as popular as they once were.

40. Troll Dolls

Made By: Dam Things
Avg. Cost: $1-$5*
Est. Value Today: $700-$1,000*

Troll Dolls are a series of small, plastic dolls that were introduced in the 60s. These dolls are characterized by their distinctive appearance, which includes chubby bodies, wild hair, and big, goofy smiles.

Advertisement
Troll Dolls @Vintage troll dolls/@Timehonoredstore/FacebookTroll Dolls @Vintage troll dolls/@Timehonoredstore/Facebook



No comments:

RYANS A SMART MAN ......VERY SMART MAN .........

  Ryan seacrest is one smart cookie.....the pressure to marry.....she like all women .....want to lock down the successful and he is  succes...