Tuesday, August 1, 2023

SOLD OUT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!>...................

 I am not surprised by this ....america......... is being sold off ......... day by day........... bit  by bit ........bill gates is  buying up farmland.........  at  an  alarming rate ............ for what  reasons!!!!!!!.......... i do not know ...........  some  sinister purpose..........obviously bill has   domination in his ond   however .......america is  probably  foreign owned  by now ....look at biden  selling shit off ......bastard.......you know  he is  .......




American Companies That Are No Longer American

Busch Beer @Busch/FacebookBusch Beer @Busch/Facebook

Many brilliant companies – from Apple to Starbucks – have been founded in the United States, starting out as small ventures to become international leaders in their fields. However, the world of business isn’t always as straightforward as it looks. Regardless of how well-rooted a company’s American history is, it doesn’t mean that it will always belong to Uncle Sam. 

In fact, many quintessentially American brands are no longer American-owned at all. From Ben and Jerry’s to IBM and Holiday Inn, overseas investors have played a big part in keeping these companies moving forward. Without them stepping in, some of them may have ceased to exist altogether. 

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1. Popsicle

Original Headquarters: Oakland, California
Purchased By: 
Unilever
Country: England

Popsicle has such an interesting history that it’s almost Hollywood. The recipe was created by 11-year-old Oakland native Francis Epperson when he accidentally left a drink outside overnight with a stick in it. When he returned to it the next day, it was a popsicle. As an adult, he released the product to the world and it was an instant hit. 

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Popsicle ©JeniFoto / Shutterstock.comPopsicle ©JeniFoto / Shutterstock.com

Just three years later in 1925, Epperson sold the rights to the Joe Lowe company, a move which he later regretted, stating “I haven’t been the same since.” Epperson’s rival Good Humor bought the Popsicle in 1989, but by then was a subsidiary of Unilever, making the Oakland-born Popsicle a British-Dutch owned creation. 

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2. Ben & Jerry’s

Original Headquarters: South Burlington, Vermont
Purchased By: 
Unilever
Country: England

Ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s has made a name for itself as a pop-culture staple. The brand is mentioned in countless movies and TV shows as one of America’s most-beloved foods. The origin story is sweet too, with best friends Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield opening their own parlor in 1978. 

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Ben & Jerry's ©AVC Photo Studio / Shutterstock.comBen & Jerry's ©AVC Photo Studio / Shutterstock.com

In 2000, Ben & Jerry’s announced it had been bought by London-based conglomerate Unilever. The deal was struck for $326 million, with Unilever being the highest bidder out of three different companies looking to make the takeover. The purchase helped to boost Unilever’s portfolio.

3. Burger King

Original Headquarters: Miami, Florida
Purchased By: 
Restaurant Brands International
Country: Canada

Fast food has long since been an institution in the United States, with many names, including Burger King, making a huge amount of profit. James McLamore and David Egerton first opened their store called “Insta Burger King” in Miami back in 1954. Little did they know they were creating an international brand. 

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Burger King ©Sorbis / Shutterstock.comBurger King ©Sorbis / Shutterstock.com
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Just over 10 years later, Burger King was sold for the first time. Since then, it’s been owned by several companies. As of 2020, Canadian company Restaurant Brands International is the proud owner of the Big Whopper, which merged with Tim Horton’s. BK still receives financial backing from NYC’s 3G Capital. 

4. Trader Joe’s

Original Headquarters: Monrovia, California
Purchased By: 
Theo Albrecht
Country: Germany

Competition in the convenience store sector has always been fierce, especially if it’s located in a heavily populated area. Back in 1967, Joe Coulombe started stocking unusual and hard to come by foods to try and entice customers into shopping with him instead of at 7-Eleven. It worked. 

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Trader Joe's ©Sundry Photography / Shutterstock.comTrader Joe's ©Sundry Photography / Shutterstock.com
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That store is still open today, but Joe sold Trader Joe’s in 1979. The owner of Aldi Nord, Theo Albrecht became the new owner. Aldi is a huge supermarket chain, so the Albrecht’s have a great deal of family money. Theo is said to be worth over $16 billion thanks to his wise investments. 

5. American Apparel

Original Headquarters: Los Angeles, California
Purchased By: 
Gildan Activewear
Country: Canada

One of the most appealing aspects of clothing retailer American Apparel for consumers was its slogan, “Made in USA – Sweatshop free.” For the conscientious shopper, this was a brilliant brand. Everything went swimmingly for the company up until 2015, when it went bust and scrambled to get back on its feet. 



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