Hypocricy

It;s okay to show pics of dead people .......but say the wrong word ........and these  servile  bastards  at facebook ......... instagram ....twitter.......  oh that's bad ,......dead people.........  we  need  that........  that's  advertising ......war is  good .........people  love  to  see death.......... no bad words ....hypocrisy  .....and america  is the worst  ......those  fuckers  at  face book......... the liberal weak menatlity ........but they will show you death .........people are fascinated  by death .............not sure  how ......they  spin it  .....but no bad words .......or the truth !!!!!!wow no ...... the weak disperse as soon as you say the truth ........i hate the masses ......... they are  worthless........... and  do not  know they are  being  fucked over  by govt  .....but they bend over ......look at the mass  vaccinated...........  they  run like  mice  to get needles......... not even not even asking what's in it ........just  getting vaccinated  trusting the words of  that ....so called  doctor fauci .......good luck   .....gets paid  well you dont 

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Social media provides flood of images of death and carnage from Ukraine war – and contributes to weaker journalism standards

A soldier's body lies next to a destroyed Russian truck on the outskirts of Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Feb. 25, 2022. <a href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/RussiaUkraineWar100DaysExplainer/1a73a1612aba4c479dfb2a16af7f21cd/photo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda</a>
A soldier's body lies next to a destroyed Russian truck on the outskirts of Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Feb. 25, 2022. AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda

Photos of civilians killed or injured in the Russia-Ukraine war are widespread, particularly online, both on social media and in professional news media.

Editors have always published images of dead or suffering people during times of crisis, like wars and natural disasters. But the current crisis has delivered many more of these images, more widely published online, than ever before.

“It’s all over social media,” says Nancy San Martin, a longtime former foreign correspondent and editor at the Miami Herald. And not just online. Mainstream journalists are also departing from their traditional tendency to avoid prominently featuring images of dead people or particularly direct depictions of physical injuries.

But in times of conflict overseas, those standard practices tend to ease, San Martin, now deputy managing editor for the history and culture desk at National Geographic, told me in a phone interview: “War will always open that door. Part of our role is to document the consequences of war and all that it entails.”

Editorial oversight has traditionally been part of the equation – the practice of a group of journalists who ensure context, balancing the significance and importance of what an image depicts with its gruesomeness. They might, for instance, choose a different angle of an injured or dead person that shows less blood, or crop an image so a dead person’s face isn’t visible, or choose to withhold an image altogether while providing written information about what happened.

As a longtime journalist and editor following media, journalism and human rights, I know images can become public icons symbolizing major events.

The flood of images from the Ukraine war runs deep and wide. It contains many potentially iconic images but also shows more raw carnage than in past conflicts.

Alexander Gardner’s photos, along with those of Mathew Brady, depicted casualties of the U.S. Civil War and were among the first to show people who had been killed in combat. <a href="https://www.loc.gov/resource/ds.05174/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Alexander Gardner via Library of Congress" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Alexander Gardner via Library of Congress</a>
Alexander Gardner’s photos, along with those of Mathew Brady, depicted casualties of the U.S. Civil War and were among the first to show people who had been killed in combat. Alexander Gardner via Library of Congress

Powerful images

From the earliest days of photography in the 19th century, war has been a common subject, including during the U.S. Civil War.

Certain images have become famous, such as Joe Rosenthal’s World War II image of U.S. Marines raising the flag on Mount Suribachi, signaling the capture of Iwo Jima from the Japanese Imperial Army in February 1945. It was distributed by The Associated Press and ran on the front pages of many U.S. newspapers.








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