Monday, March 25, 2024

WHAT FOOL WANTS TO GO THERE .......


What fucking fool in their right mind...... would want to waste money in north korea .....really a shitty ...... fucking ....... brainwashed nation of  weak people ........ who  cannot  enjoy their   bleak shitty life .....why would anyone  want to work ......and  take time off  .......to  go to a  miserable shithole  ...... ruled  by  a  fucking psychopath .....

Really they offer nothing ........ but   fucking  shit life......... and   total totalitarian control .........look at that  guy .......who went there...... and  took a poster .....oscar bedwarmer or fultimyer/or ottoman....or some strange name .......he took a poster...... and  then ended  up dead.....he came home from korea....and  died ......not  a great  ad for a vacation ........i certainly have no   inclination to go to a country ........that hates it's own people...... and eats dogs .....go figure ...... .....


Bleak images show snapshots of daily life in the closed world of North Korea

  • An AFP photographer captured rare shots showing everyday life in North Korea.

  • Pedro Pardo accessed a remote part of the border in China's Jilin province to get the photos.

  • `The images show a bleak picture of life in the completely isolated nation.

An AFP photographer captured rare images showing daily life in North Korea.

To get the photos, Pedro Pardo accessed a remote part of North Korea's border with China in the latter's Jilin province.

The images Pardo took between February 26 and March 1 offer a bleak yet fascinating look at life in a country shrouded in secrecy.

North Korea was founded in 1948 under Kim Il-sung as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), inspired by strict Marxist-Leninist principles.

Its population of roughly 26 million people lives largely in isolation from the rest of the world in the austere communist state, barred from going abroad without permission from the government and subjected to state-run media that blare propaganda praising the nation and its supreme leader, Kim Jong Un.

North Korea's self-imposed isolation is largely due to its guiding principle of "juche," or "self-reliance" — the idea that it should be able to function completely independently and remain separate from the rest of the world.

In practice, this has achieved little other than to stifle the country's economy and trade, and many of its citizens face high poverty levels and severe food shortages. The CIA says the country "remains one of the World's most isolated and one of Asia's poorest."

Since the 1950s, it is estimated that around 31,000 North Koreans have sought to escape and defected to South Korea, The Guardian reported in January.

That number surged last year amid what the unification ministry in Seoul called "worsening conditions in North Korea."

Pardo's photos present a unique look into those conditions and life in one of the world's last communist states.

North Korean soldiers working on the border.

North Korean soldiers working on the border.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

The North Korean city of Hyesan.

The North Korean city of Hyesan.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

A wagon in the North Korean city of Namyang.

A mobile wagon in the North Korean city of Namyang.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

A sign on a hillside in the town of Chunggang reads: "My country is the best."

A sign saying "My country is the best"
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

A watchtower by the border in Hyesan.

A watchtower on the border in the North Korean village of Hyesan.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

Portraits of former North Korean leaders Kim Il sung and Kim Jong Il in Chunggang.

Chunggang.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

Another set of portraits of the former leaders on a government building in Namyang.

A government building in Namyang.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

North Korean people working in a field.

North Korean people working in a field.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

A sign in Chunggang reading: "Let's unify the party and all society with the revolutionary ideas of comrade Kim Jong Un!"

A sign reading, "Let's unify the party and all society with the revolutionary ideas of comrade Kim Jong Un!" in Chunggang.
Pedro Pardo / AFP via Getty Images

Trucks crossing a border bridge connecting Changbai, China, and Hyesan, North Korea.


North Korea's tallest building is an abandoned hotel that has never hosted a single guest. Take a closer look at the 'Hotel of Doom.'

  • Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea, is one of the tallest unoccupied buildings in the world.

  • Construction on the "Hotel of Doom" began in 1987 and has stopped and started several times.

  • One side of the 1,080-foot building has been outfitted with LED screens used for light shows.

At 1,080 feet, North Korea's Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang is one of the tallest unoccupied buildings in the world.

The 105-story "Hotel of Doom," which is also North Korea's tallest building, has never hosted a single guest. Construction began almost 40 years ago, and it is not yet complete — the cost of finishing the building is estimated to be around 5% of the country's entire GDP.

Still, Ryugyong Hotel remains a subject of international fascination.

Here's the story behind the abandoned skyscraper that dominates the capital city's skyline.

Construction on the Ryugyong Hotel began in Pyongyang in 1987, but halted due to economic troubles in North Korea.

The Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea, in 1990.
The Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea, in 1990.Vincent Yu/AP

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, North Korea lost its main trading partner and source of aid, spurring an economic crisis, CNN reported.

The hotel reached its full height in 1992, but the inside was never completed.

A traffic policeman stands in front of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2019.
A traffic policeman stands in front of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2019.Dita Alangkara/AP

The Ryugyong Hotel is 105 stories tall and is sometimes referred to as the 105 Building.

To this day, it has never hosted a single guest.

Ongoing construction of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2010.
Ongoing construction of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2010.Eric Lafforgue/Art In All Of Us/Corbis via Getty Images

Despite its aversion to foreign visitors, North Korea does have several functional hotels in Pyongyang. Until the Ryugyong Hotel is completed, the Yanggakdo International Hotel is the city's largest, and the Ryanggang Hotel is widely regarded as the fanciest.

Its pyramid shape dominates the Pyongyang skyline from miles away.

The Ryugyong Hotel seen from a road outside Pyongyang in 2011.
The Ryugyong Hotel seen from a road outside Pyongyang in 2011.Greg Baker/AP

Each of the building's three sections, which join together at the top, are 100 meters, or 328 feet long, according to Atlas Obscura.

At the very top of the building, an eight-story cone-shaped section was supposed to feature revolving restaurants.

The top of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2015.
The top of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2015.Damir Sagolj/Reuters

It remains empty, like the rest of the hotel.

More external work began on the hotel in 2008 with the installation of glass panels over its entire surface.

Construction on the Ryugyong Hotel in 2010.
Construction on the Ryugyong Hotel in 2010.Eric Lafforgue/Art In All Of Us/Corbis via Getty Images

An Egyptian contractor, the Orascom group, took over the project and revived construction in 2008, Reuters reported.

It would cost an estimated $2 billion to finally finish the Ryugyong Hotel, Reuters reported in 2008, citing South Korean media.

A crane on the roof of the Ryugyong Hotel.
A crane on the roof of the Ryugyong Hotel.Eric Lafforgue/Art In All Of Us/Corbis via Getty Images

North Korea's gross domestic product is around $40 billion, according to the most recent data on CIA's World Factbook. That makes the cost of finishing the building around 5% of the country's entire GDP.

In the meantime, North Korea has found other uses for the building.

Fireworks around the Ryugyong Hotel to celebrate May Day in 2009.
Fireworks around the Ryugyong Hotel to celebrate May Day in 2009.KCNA/Reuters

Pyongyang celebrated May Day in 2009 with a fireworks display framing the Ryugyong Hotel.

It serves as a dramatic backdrop for arts troupes' performances.

Members of a Socialist Women's Union propaganda troupe perform in front of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2019.
Members of a Socialist Women's Union propaganda troupe perform in front of the Ryugyong Hotel in 2019.Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

The troupes' performances usually contain propaganda messages. North Korea sent an arts troupe to the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea.

It also provides a backdrop for propaganda messages made up of over 100,000 LED screens.

Designer Kim Yong Il stands next to his light show on the facade of the Ryugyong Hotel.

like i said .........



 

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