Thursday, August 3, 2023

THE SHIThOLE LIST .............enjoy or not ...........

 Herfe is the shithole list .........i do not  know  what else to call it ............  but all the  things mentioned............   relates to  shitholism .........and  total  fucking garbage  living ...........




Crime, Poverty, & Disasters: The Most Miserable Cities In The United States

It's a sad fact, but not all cities in the United States are destinations for those looking to make a move in their life. Have it be the crime rate, a cities affinity for natural disasters, or the fact that it was unable to rebuild after an economic crash; not all cities are created equal.

From Danville, Virginia, on the east coast to Lancaster, California, on the west coast, here are some of the most miserable cities in the US.

San Bernardino, California

San Bernardino, California
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Don't let the state of California fool you; San Bernardino isn't exactly a place to lay down roots. The city is considered one of the most poverty-stricken cities in the US, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, with 30% of its occupants living under the poverty line.

And that's not even taking into consideration the high crime rate; something San Bernardino has struggled with for years. According to the Morgan Quitno Press, this particular California city is one of the most dangerous in the country.

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Macon, Georgia

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Time hasn't been great to the city of Macon, Georgia. From 2010-2018 the city lost 1.7% of its 153,000 person population. And it's no secret as to why those people wanted to get out of the city.

In Macon, 26% of people are living in poverty with dilapidated homes and overgrown yards. According to some residents who live in the city still, Macon is losing its race against blight, and they don't have the recourses to stop it.

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Pasadena, Texas

Pasadena, Texas
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Even in a year like 2021, Pasadena, Texas, is still living back in the times of the Civil War. In the northern part of the city are the Latino people, while the southern-most part of the city houses white families.

Race issues, social class differences, and not to mention the headquarters of the Ku Klux Klan, Pasadena, Texas, isn't even one of the cities that's okay to drive through. It's okay to ditch this one altogether.

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Reading, Pennsylvania

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According to the 2010 census, Reading, Pennsylvania, has one of the highest percentages of people living in poverty in a city of more than 65,000 in the entire country, at a solid 36%. The following year, the city of Reading was declared the poorest small city in the US.

After a mass closing of the city's factories and industry, more than 44% of households had to resort to food stamps. Life there cannot be easy.

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Plainfield, New Jersey

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For people who don't like other people, West New York, New Jersey, is not the place to visit. It is estimated that there are 52,800 people per square mile in the whole city, making it one of the more densely populated areas in the country.

Not only that, but the town is growing, even with 22% of the population lying under the poverty line. Even without that percentage, the sheer number of people per square mile sounds miserable.

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Lancaster, California

Lancaster, California
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A desert city with a weirdly high population of over 160,000, Lancaster, California isn't what people should think of when they think of the Golden Coast. With little else to do in the secluded area, issues with drug addiction have run ramped and the poverty rate is at a startling 23%.

And while Mayor R. Rex Parris is doing what he can to revamp the city's image, it still has a long way to go. Needless to say, this Lancaster isn't a tourist destination for those visiting California.

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Huntington, West Virginia

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First off, Huntington, West Virginia, is a coal mining town, so the people there are most likely going to have some underlying lung issues, which sounds horrible. On top of that, the city is wildly considered one of the most unhealthy in the country.

According to a Fox News article, more than half of the adults in the area are obese, with the city leading the charge in cases surrounding heart disease and diabetes.

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St. Louis, Missouri

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Unfortunately, when it comes to St. Louis, Missouri, crime and the city kind of go hand in hand. The city is stark with gun violence, with gun-related deaths rising 33% since 2015. With that statistic, it's no wonder people are leaving. From 2010-2018, a solid 5% of the city's almost 303,000 people have found homes elsewhere.

While the past and present mayors have been making crime their number one priority, the city is still poverty-stricken and violent, even in 2021.

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Hemet, California

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Ever since the 2008 recession, Hemet, California, has gone downhill very fast. Once a promising community, Hemet has around 23% of people living in poverty, even with its low-income housing that has brought people to the city.

Unfortunately, cheap housing sometimes brings not-so-great people, and the crime rate in Hemet has shot through the roof. In 2016 alone, 398 aggravated assaults were logged, 170 robberies were reported, and 623 cars were stolen off the streets. Not exactly a family-friends area. And, hello, it's prone to wildfires!

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Shreveport, Louisiana

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Shreveport, Louisiana, doesn't really have a lot going for it. Aside from its natural beauty, this particular southern city is riddled with crime-related violence, including aggravated assault, something that doubled from 2015 to 2016.

On top of that, the city is prone to flooding from the neighboring Red River, and the 26% of people living in poverty don't exactly have the funds to reconstruct their already delipidated homes and yards.



Once a proud steel manufacturing city with a population of 170,000, Youngstown, Ohio, has since become a deteriorating town of 65,000 people. Of those people, a startling 37% live below the poverty line.

Interestingly, Youngstown is also a haven for organized crime and is considered to be pretty corrupt. According to The New Republic, everyone from the chief of police and the force to the county engineer and several defense attorneys is run by the local mob.

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Danville, Virginia

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Ever since its tobacco and textile mills shut down, Danville, Virginia, went from one of the richest towns in the Piedmont area to one of the poorest. With 21% of the 40,000 person population now living in poverty, it's no wonder people are looking to move elsewhere.

Between 2010 and 2018, around 5.5% of the population left Danville, looking for work and a new life elsewhere. Thankfully, the town is doing its best to turn things around.

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Jackson, Mississippi

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Mississippi might be full of southern charm, but the city of Jackson is just sad to think about. Not only is 29% of the population living under the poverty level, but in February of 2021, more than 20,000 homes were threatened with getting their water turned off due to $45 million worth of unpaid utility bills across the city.

In 2020, the city's homicide rate reached an all-time high with 79.69 homicides per 100,000 residents.

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Mansfield, Ohio

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Since the loss of the industrial age of work in Mansfield, Ohio, not to mention the closing of the GM factory in 2010, more and more jobs have been lost, bringing the poverty rate in the city up to 24%.

With people looking for an easy way to put food on the table, the crime rate has surged to an all-time high in the city, too, rising 37% from 2012 to 2017.

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Cleveland, Ohio

Cleveland, Ohio
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Once considered the "best location in the nation" by businesses, Cleveland, Ohio, has since had a major downturn in appeal. Since losing its manufacturing industry, a solid percent of Cleveland's population lives in poverty, a solid 35%. And the crime rate has also risen, namely gun violence.

And the fact that Forbes named the place one of the most miserable cities in the United States doesn't really do much for Cleveland's character.

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Harlingen, Texas

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Dry, hot, and known to have little to no rainfall, Harlingen, Texas, isn't for the faint of heart. Not only does around 30% of the population live under the poverty line, but now they're experiencing something that hasn't ever really been a point of worry.

In recent years, Harlingen has experienced an absurd amount of flooding. Call it global warming or call it bad luck, but a good chunk of the estimated 65,000 residents living there don't have easy lives.

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Anderson, Indiana

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Since the closing of the GM motor factories in Anderson, Indiana, more than 23,000 people have lost their jobs. According to the Indiana Business Review, the city is leaning towards a negative economic trend. The journal stated that due to the downward spiral in the city's economy, there would be an "acceleration in the number of food stamp recipients."

Due to mass unemployment, around 25% of the city's population lives under the poverty line.

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Fort Pierce, Florida

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When people think of the sandy beaches of Florida, Fort Pierce doesn't come to mind. not only does 36% of the population live in poverty, but the city has to reapply sand to its beaches every so often because of erosion.

One a prominent citrus farming town, many of the orchards have been shut down due to disease. Now, people are just trying to get by in the tiny hurricane-prone city located between the big cities of Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

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Union City, New Jersey

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In 2010, Union City, New Jersey, was named the most densely populated city in the country, with 54,138 people per square mile. For people who enjoy precious “me time,” this is one miserable city. Not to mention 23% of the population lives below the poverty line.

Thankfully, Union City has gotten a bit better over the years. In 2015, it was even named one of the best small cities to live in by AARP.

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Georgia Is Too Expensive

Tents belonging to people without housing setup along an overpass during a heat advisory in Atlanta, Georgia, US, on Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Temperatures in Atlanta on Wednesday flirted with a record-high and triple digits, just a week after the city smashed a 70-year-old daily temperature record when it hit 99 degrees, reports The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
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While it might come as a surprise to see Georgia on this list, there is a reason. People tend to visit Georgia, typically Atlanta, but they don't move there. On the contrary, it seems people are trying to leave the state. What it comes down to are expenses.

Governing magazine acknowledged that rent costs were up 28% in the city since 2000, compared to the nine percent raise in other states around the country. In 2018, A HotPads report found that the renting prices were rising three times faster than that of other cities. It’s no wonder people want to find other places to settle down!




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