Friday, August 18, 2023

ONLY IN INDIA ............................

 


I used to wanna  go to india ......but as i get older  ........the idea schlepping .to a  dirty city like  mumbai.....i liked it  better when it was  called  calcutta ....



Bizarre, Unusual, and Expensive Things You Only See in India

©olmoroz & Zzvet/stock.adobe.com©olmoroz & Zzvet/stock.adobe.com

India is a spiritual country with thousands of years of rich history and an ever-growing population that has now topped 1.4 billion people. With every twist and every turn that one takes down the streets of Mumbai, Jaipur, Agra, New Delhi, Kerala, or Varanasi, there will be a new surprise waiting.

Whether it’s one of the world’s most recognizable structures, ‘blood rain,’ a floating lake, or one of its 2,000,000+ Hindu temples, India is not lacking for things to see. There’s not enough time in the world to see them all, but let’s take a little time to take a gander at some of the unusual, expensive, and oddly bizarre things that India has to offer.

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1. Gold Face Masks

Found in: Prune
Est. Cost: $4,000*

In the summer of 2020, the world was attempting to cope with an invisible enemy, and vaccines weren’t even a blip on the radar. However, a man from the western Indian city of Prune took the matter of self-protection into his own hands.

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Businessman Shankar Kurhade hired a craftsman to forge him a Covid mask made out of two ounces of the most precious metal around, gold. Shankar says the mask is very thin and has incredible small pores that allow him to breathe easily while wearing his custom mask in public.

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2. Red Rain

Found in: Idukki, Kerala
Est. Cost: N/A

The southwestern district of Kerala is known for its beautiful beaches with stunning blue seas, its black sands, and the red rains that have randomly fallen from its skies over the last two hundred years. Since its first documentation in 1818, there have been many theories about what could be causing the ‘blood rain.’

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The fallout from a hypothetical meteor burst was one hypothesis that was thrown around for a while. Another is the Hindu belief that when the sky rains blood, those without sin have lost their lives. The Indian government has since come up with a less outer-world explanation — airborne spores from a local strain of algae.

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3. Realistic Mannequins

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: $200-$1,000

One of the best ways to promote a product is to put it on display for all to see, and that’s exactly what retailers are doing when they dress mannequins in clothing and set them up in all of the store’s best vantage points. The problem is that very few customers are the same size as the dummy on display.

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In several major cities across India, shops have begun using mannequins that are much more comparable to the average person’s form than what you’d be used to seeing at Abercrombie & Fitch. The dummies have curves, contours, and ‘dad-bods’ that better understand how well an article of clothing will truly fit.

4. Extreme Electrical Lines

Found in: Nationwide  
Est. Cost: N/A

As more people arrive in a city, the need for additional electric lines because larger. Due to the unimaginable amount of people who live in India’s most densely populated areas, the power lines are every bit of a mess as you could imagine.

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There are cables upon cables upon cables, and each of them is intertwined with a half dozen (or more) others. After seeing this, untangling headphone wires doesn’t seem nearly as bad. Considering the constant threat of imminent danger they’re under it’s a wonder how electricians aren’t one of the most revered professions in India.

5. 2 Million Hindu Temples

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

Amongst the many historical wonders that India is known for are the incredible mosques, temples, and tombs that have become symbols of the nation over the years. There are more than two million Hindu temples (and another 300,000 Muslim mosques) in India, including 23,000 Hindu temples in the riverside city of Varanasi alone.

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To put things into perspective: there are more Hindu temples in India than there are people in any one of Bahrain, Estonia, or Latvia. However, when looking at the fact that India’s Hindu population makes up almost 80% of the country’s 1.4 billion people, two million temples actually seem reasonable, if not too few.

6. Highest Rail Bridge in the World

Found in: Jammu and Kashmir
Est. Cost: $195,120*

Millions of historical structures in India have been around for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. However, lost in all of this history are the modern accomplishments of this great nation. For instance, in the far north of the country is the highest rail bridge in the world. 

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Construction of the bridge began in 2004, and if all goes well, commuters will be able to cross the Chenab River that lies between Bakkal and Kauri (via train) from 1,178 feet above. The views of the landscape range from the Chenab Bridge are sure to take anyone’s breath away.

7. The Amritsar Golden Temple

Found in: Punjab
Est. Cost: $17-$20 Million*

Built on top of 67-square-feet of marble in the mid-1500s, Sri Harmandir Sahib (the Amritsar Golden Temple) is the top spiritual shrine in the Sikh religion. The temple draws visitors from across the globe, but not everyone goes there for religious reasons. 

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The Amritsar Golden Temple has an open-door policy for people of all beliefs (or lack thereof). Visitors are welcome to explore the temple and wonder at the 880 lbs of 24-carat gold leaf that gave it its majestic appearance. Moreover, the temple provides free vegetarian cuisine to 50,000+ visitors every day.

8. Nuisance Detectors

Found in: Several Major Cities
Est. Cost: 6 Months in Prison

If you thought the hall monitors at school were annoying, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet. Several of the major cities in India have employed Nuisance Detectors whose jobs are to ticket people for, you guessed it, causing a nuisance. A handful of nuisances are focused on more than the others. They are the ones that obviously cause a disturbance to the general public.

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Urinating and defecating in public both qualify as punishable nuisances, as does fornication (of any kind). As made famous by the government in Singapore, spitting in public is also considered to be a nuisance in India.

9. Fish Swallowing Asthma “Cure”

Found in: Hyderabad
Est. Cost: $0.20 – $0.66* / Treatment

The Goud family from Hyderabad has invented what they claim to be a home remedy “miracle cure” for asthma. They won’t tell doctors what’s in it, nor will they let it be taken for testing, but they do claim a 100% success rate if the “treatment” is followed to a tee.

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All you have to do is show up for treatment at the start of the monsoon season each year (for seven years), and swallow a small live fish that’s been attached to a ball of yellow paste (with undisclosed ingredients). Then you have to eat nothing but dried mango, rice, sugar, spinach, lamb, and 20 other very specific ingredients for 45 days. Sounds easy, doesn’t it?

10. A Dog Temple

Found in: Channaptna, Karnataka
Est. Cost: Unknown

In the southern central village of Channapatna, a temple was built next to the Goddess Kempamma’s temple (the deity whom the villagers revere the most) in 2010 because the Goddess is said to have visited a man in his dream and bade him have it done. 

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The new temple was built in honor of two of the village’s dogs, who had vanished without a trace. Statues of the missing dogs now stand proud within the temple’s walls, and every year Channapatna holds a festival that celebrates the lives of the lost dogs.

11. Monsoon Season

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

Northern Australians have cyclone season, Americans from the southeastern States deal with hurricane season, and India is hit with monsoonal rains. The main difference between the three is that most of the houses in India are not built well enough or in safe enough places to protect them from annual flooding.

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The monsoons season, and the flooded living room that comes with it, are something that the locals have grown accustomed to. It shows up every May/June and stays until September/October, so the best thing to do is get a good pair of swim shorts and a comfortable pair of Crocs because it’s going to get wet.

12. Elephants on Small Boats

Found in: Various Rivers and Lakes Across the Country
Est. Cost: N/A

Anytime an elephant is involved, there is the chance that something could go terribly wrong, and elephants happen to be around quite a bit in India. Miraculously, not nearly as many elephant accidents occur as one would expect, but that’s not for lack of unsafe practices.

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Transporting an elephant can’t be easy, but they seem to have mastered the craft in India. Whether by truck, train, or even boat, the people of India have come up with creative ways of moving Earth’s largest land mammal from point A to point B in the most efficient manner.

13. The ‘Mini Taj

Found in: Aurangabad, Maharashtra
Est. Cost: $500,000* (2022)

The Taj Mahal is arguably the most well-known structure in India and one of the most recognizable in the world. Not long after the Taj was built, a smaller, less impressive, but still extravagant structure was erected 615 miles southwest of the original. It’s called Bibi Ka Maqbara, or the ‘Mini Taj.’

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The ‘Mini Taj’ was, in fact, commissioned by the son of Mumtaz Mahal (the woman for whom the Taj Mahal was built), Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. Following in his father’s footsteps, he also built a shrine for the love of his life, his wife, Diras Banu Begum. A shrine that cost approximately $8,700 to build in 1660.

14. Camel Art

Found in: Bikaner
Est. Cost: N/A

For as far back as the written records go (and even further back, still), camels have been integral to human survival. They have been the helping hands that have (literally) carried civilizations on their backs through harsh climates and terrains. At times, they’ve been the sole companion of a lonesome traveler. In Bikaner, Rajasthan, the people have found a way to celebrate all that these “Ships of the Desert” have done for us. 

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They bring in the new year by hosting an annual International Camel Festival every January. The highlight of the festival? The beautifully adorned camels, of course. They’ve been dressed by their people and given artistically marvelous haircuts as well.

15. Mustache For Pay

Found in: Madhya Pradesh
Est. Cost: Unknown

It’s now ‘Movember’ every day in Madhya Pradesh, at least, amongst some of the authority figures, it is. And why? Because the region’s police chief has decided to incentivize growing a mustache. That’s right, all police officers who opt to grow out their whiskers are privy to a pay raise. 

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The chief of police believed that his mouth-browed officers were garnering more respect than those with naked upper lips. If a future in the Madhya Pradesh police force is what you’re after, be sure to pack lots of Old Spice mustache wax. Remember, when it comes to a ‘stache, style commands respect.

16. ‘Star of India’: Worlds Most Expensive Rolls Royce

Found in: Rajkot, Gujarat
Est. Cost:$8.5 Million*

The ‘Star of India’ is a custom-crafted 1934 Rolls Royce Phantom II made especially for the Maharaja of Rajkot, Gujarat. Thirty-four years after its creation, the seven-seat ‘Star’ was sold by the Maharaja’s grandson and was seemingly lost to the family forever.

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42-years-later, the same fourteen headlight, saffron-colored interior Rolls Royce showed up at an auction in Monaco and was repurchased by the very same grandson of the Maharajah who had sold the ‘Star’ in 1968. The Phantom II’s book value is close to $500,000, but its importance for the Maharaja’s family made its repurchase price closer to $8.5 million.

17. The Exotica

Found in: Lucknow
Est. Cost: $1,437 / Pound*

The northern Indian city of Lucknow is home to incredibly designed temples, delicious street food, and India’s most expensive dessert, Exotica. The dry mithai is composed of a collection of ingredients from around the world, including American blueberries, Aussie and South African macadamia nuts, European hazelnuts, and a few others.

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The most important (and expensive) of the sweet’s ingredients are the 100% edible gold leaves in which the internationally sourced ingredients have been incased. The expensive sweets have been packaged into a specially designed box “that increases the shelf life by 20-30 days.”

18. Bheem’ India’s Most Expensive Buffalo

Found in: Jodhpur, Rajasthan
Est. Cost: $3.12 Million*

Weighing in at a little over 3,300 lbs, and measuring 6-feet from hoof to head and 14-feet long, Bheem, of the Murrah breed, is the Andre the Giant of Buffalos — and he’s got the appetite to prove it. Every day, this massive bull drinks approximately 25 liters of milk and eats 2.2 pounds each of clarified butter (ghee) and a mix of cashews and almonds.

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At a cattle fair, Arvind Jangid, the man who raised Bheem, proved that not everything has a price when he turned down an offer of 24 crores ($3.12 million) for his prized buffalo. Jangid and Bheem attend cattle fairs together to raise awareness about Bheem’s diminishing breed for conservation purposes.

19. Land of Snakes

Found in: Shetpal, Maharashtra
Est. Cost: N/A

As its name entails, the village of Shetpal is probably not the type of place that Indiana Jones would enjoy visiting, what with his paralyzing fear of snakes and all. The more than 2,600 villagers of Shetpal don’t share Indy’s fear. 

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They live in harmony alongside the appendage-free creatures and build ‘cobra huts’ into each home. You know, just in case a cobra decides to stay the night. There is such admiration for snakes in Shetpal that not only do the villagers worship the serpents, but they also let their children handle them unsupervised. Unbelievably, there has never been a (reported) case of the deadly snakes biting any of the villagers.

20. Gold Plated Dosa

Found in: Bangalore
Est. Cost: $19*

Dosas have been part of southern Indian cuisine for centuries. They have few ingredients, take a short time to prepare, and are one of the cheapest foods around — which makes them quite popular across all classes. In Bangalore, a city in India’s south, the Raj Bhog restaurant has taken the classic dosa and given it an injection of glam.

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Or, should we say a coating of glam? A potato masala-stuffed rice and lentil pancake should only cost about $0.50 apiece. However, Raj Bhog patrons have the option to choose from a variety of dosas that have had 24-carat gold leaves draped over the top of them for forty times the price.

21. Stolen Brand Name Knock-off Stores

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

The competitive world of retail knows no bounds in India. Businesspeople are not ashamed to use other companies’ fame for their own benefit. You’ll find knock-off brand stores all over the country, and few (if any) of them will sell something remotely similar to the original.

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Just know that wherever you are in India, a taste of home is never too far away. Google and WhatsApp have stores in every city. Only they’re a little different here than you might be used to.

22. Onam Festival

Found in: Kerala
Est. Cost: Free

Keralites hold the annual Onam Festival at the start of the Malayalam year, during the month of Chingam. The festival celebrates the return of King Mahabali, but more importantly, it also honors Vishnu’s appearance in the form of the avatar Vamana. The 10-day event is focused on happiness and prosperity, and the Malayalis have beautiful ways of showing it. 

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Those in the festive mood make intricate ‘Pookkalam’ (flower carpets) and lay them out as welcome mats for the King’s spiritual arrival. Other common Onam Festival events include the much anticipated Snake Boat Races and the performance of the traditional Keralite dance, the Kaikottikali.

23. Gold and Diamond Contact Lens

Found in: Mumbai
Est. Cost: $15,000*

Dr. Chawan of the Shekhar Eye Research Center in Mumbai has revolutionized what it means to have ‘beautiful eyes.’ The doctor has done so by designing contact lenses made with gold with several small diamonds encircling each eye. The placement of the gems is intended to limit ocular irritation by allowing an optimum amount of oxygen to flow through.

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If you’re looking for a way to draw attention to your eyes, this is it. Forget about whatever you might find at Zale’s or Tiffany’s, because nothing will bring attention to your eyes more than a pair of golden diamond-studded lenses. They’re a bargain at $15,000 a pair and will (literally) make your eyes sparkle.

24. Animals on Public Transportation

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

Traveling by public transportation is a constant game of chance. First, you don’t know if there will be room to get on. If you manage to board, the chances of getting a seat are even fewer and further between. In the off-chance that a seat is available, the next gamble is seeing who will sit down next to you. 

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In India, that travel companion could be anyone up to and including one of the local cows. If one of the revered bovines decides to hop on a bus or ride the rails with you, try not to be alarmed. It’s probably just on its way home.

25. Bus Hammocks

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: One Bed Sheet / Local Bus Fare

As a result of the outrageous number of people in India and the lack of seating on public transportation. On the trains, you’ll see people huddled together with little room to move, but on the busses, things are a little different; some might say, “A little more chilled out.”

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When traveling by bus, be sure to watch your head when finding your seat. It’s not uncommon to see people swaying comfortably in hammocks overhead. Some busses will have hammocks that other commuters have left behind. If not, a bedsheet from Bed Bath & Beyond should do the trick.

26. The Jewellery Car of Gold

Found in: Mumbai
Est. Cost: $4.57 Million*

The Indian-made Tata Nano is the cheapest car in the world, and as its name clearly implies, it’s one of the smallest as well. To celebrate five millennia of Indian jewelry making, Goldplus took the Nano, gave it a make-over, and instead transformed it into one of the most expensive vehicles around.

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Although a whopping 175 lbs of 22-carot gold plating and 33 lbs of silver were used to coat the Nano’s frame, what really gets people talking are the 10,000 gems that were incorporated into reimagining the vehicle’s outer design. Essentially, Tata Goldplus has taken a bicycle and turned it into a Harley.

27. Holy Cows

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

Cows are so revered in India that while giving customers rides in their vehicles, Tuk Tuk drivers have been known to pull over in the middle of the road to buy flowers and food, but not for themselves, for the cows they see along the way. 

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The bovines are literally everywhere in India. They walk down the streets. They run along the beaches. They even ride the busses. This is, of course, because in Hinduism, cows are sacred representations of Mother Earth and taken in the highest regard. Depending on where in India you are, you might want to think twice before inquiring about where to get a Whopper.

28. World’s Largest Family

Found in: Baktawng
Est. Cost: N/A

If you thought that family reunions were tough to handle, imagine what it would be like to be part of Ziona Chana’s family, otherwise known as the largest family in the world. Before his passing in 2021, Ziona Chana was the family’s patriarch. He had 39 wives (that are known), and with them, he had 94 children. 

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He lived to see his children bring 33 of his grandchildren into the world and was fortunate enough to meet one of his great-grandchildren as well. For those keeping count, that equates to 181 family members, and counting, or the most expensive family trip to Disney ever recorded.

29. Mysterious Skeleton Lake

Found in: Himalayas
Est. Cost: N/A

The Himalayan mountain range hosts the tallest peaks in the world and several of the remotest lakes in the world. 16,470-feet above sea level, one of these lakes has a dark tale to tell. More than 300 skeletons were discovered near the shores of Roopkund (Skeleton Lake), and the remains belonged to three groups that lived in different periods. So, what happened to them?

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Some scientists have theorized that a selection of those who were found beneath the surface of Skeleton Lake perished during a violent hailstorm in the 9th-century. However, that doesn’t explain how the few hundred other humans’ remains found in the lake’s shallow water met their demise. This might be one of the mysteries that remains as such forever.

30. Step Wells

Found in: Gujarat
Est. Cost: N/A

The ancient step wells of northern India are yet another of the many unsolved mysteries of the vast South Asian country. Believed to have been built sometime in the 6th-century, these wells have served several functions over the years. To begin with, step-wells were mainly used to retrieve water. 

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Over time they evolved into storage and irrigation tanks. Eventually, villagers also began to frequent them in order to reach riverbeds and ponds to wash their clothes, bathe, and attend religious ceremonies. The largest is a well-named Chand Baori. It descends close to 100-feet below the surface through a series of 3,500 stairs spread over thirteen levels.

31. Makeshift Transportation

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: Varies

With the average monthly salary in India being in the $400-$450 range, it would take approximately fifty years for someone to earn enough money to pay for a new, reasonably priced compact car. Instead of waiting until old age for a vehicle of their own, many locals have turned to “Frankensteining” makeshift cars.

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They’re not the pretty things in the world, and they sure aren’t the safest either. Heck, most of the vehicles that people build are far from the quality of a Ford Focus, but they will get their drivers to where they need to be.

32. Gold Encrusted Donuts

Found in: Various Locations
Est. Cost: $100*

Donuts have long been a favorite breakfast snack for Americans. Elsewhere in the world, however, like in India (and probably Dubai), the ringed pastry that goes so well with a morning coffee is much more than a one-dollar sugary treat that gives that boost of energy they’ve been after. 

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You won’t be able to find one of these gold-encrusted donuts at just any Dunkin’ Donuts or DNUT locations. They’re by special order only and cost approximately $100 each. If you’re looking to make your own golden rings at home, you can order a jar with 17.6 ounces of gold flakes for 3000 rupees ($40*).

33. $2 Billion Mumbai Mansion

Found in: Mumbai
Est. Cost: $2 Billion*

Antilia is a 400,000-square-foot behemoth of architecture. From a distance, it appears to be a massive skyscraper in the heart of Mumbai. Still, the fact of the matter is Antilia is a 27-floor personal residence that is second in property cost only to the Buckingham Palace.

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From its three helipads to its 50-seat cinema, this incredible super-mansion (or whatever you want to call it) comes fully equipped with everything that Mukesh Ambani, India’s richest man, and his family could possibly dream up. One room has even been designed to spit out snowflakes all year round, and why not? Ambani’s net worth is close to $100 billion after all.

34. Black Diamond iPhone

Found in: Various Locations Via Special Order
Est. Cost: $15.3 Million*

The iPhone 5 Black Diamond is a 4.76 ounce, 24-carat gold hand-crafted masterpiece that less than half of a percent of India’s 1.4 billion person population will ever come close to being able to afford. If the golden attributes of the phone weren’t enough, the screen is also made of sapphire glass. 

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Still not impressed and wondering where this iPhone got its name? Well, its home button was replaced with a 26-carat, single deep cut black diamond. If that wasn’t enough, the phone’s frame has been inlaid with 600 more diamonds — smaller ones, of course — bringing the phone’s total price to a little over $15 million.

35. Shirt Made of Pure Gold

Found in: Datta Phuge’s Closet
Est. Cost: $230,888*

Have you ever wanted to own a shirt made of solid gold? As you’d expect, of course, one of them exists. Its seven buttons are from none other than the Swarovski collection, and its base is composed of 100,000 spangles and 14,000 flowerings (all gold) stitched to a velvet base.

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Finding a matching shirt to the one that Indian entrepreneur Datta Phuge purchased won’t be as simple as browsing LVMH online catalog. These golden garbs are custom-made and cost a bit less than a quarter of a million dollars.

36. Pre-Wedding Detectives

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: $65-$200* / Day

Getting married is a huge moment in the life of every bride and groom. It’s an event that unites two individuals and binds them to one another “in sickness and in health…until death do they part.” That being said, it would be nice to know if the person you’re marrying is actually who they say they are.

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That’s where pre-marital private investigators come into play. Private detectives who investigate potential spouses have never been in higher demand in India. $200 for a one-day sleuthing mission might seem like a bargain, but it’s a little less than half of the average monthly wage in India.

37. Temple of Rats

Found in: Deshnoke, Rajasthan
Est. Cost: N/A

One of two things usually comes to mind when most people think of rats. They either think of the creepy, disgusting rodents that have terrorized their nightmares or Master Splinter from Ninja Turtles. Rarely (if ever) would a Westerner consider them to be holy. However, when visiting the Karni Mata Temple in Deshnoke, there’s no choice but to treat them as such.

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More than 25,000 rats roam freely among the halls, chambers, and grounds of Karni Mata without fear of danger. If you spot a solid white rat amongst the crowd, you should consider it an honor. They’re considered to be the holiest of all the temple’s rodents.

38. World’s Highest Road

Found in:  Jammu and Kashmir
Est. Cost: Unknown

In India, roads have been built that give people access to some of the world’s most remote locations. One of which is in Eastern Ladakh, smack dab in the heart of the Himalayas. It’s a section of the Ladakh Road that sits 19,300 feet above sea level — a distinction that makes it the highest road on the planet that’s accessible by car. 

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Tourists have been known to take hatchbacks and sedans on their Himalayan road trips, but in order to have the best chance of avoiding vehicular problems while traversing the Ladakh Road, it’s advised to rent something more like a STLA or other 4x4s of the like.

39. The Taj Mahal

Found in: Agra
Est. Cost: $1 Billion* (2020)

Built between 1632 and 1653 as a tomb for Mumtaz Mahal (Shah Jahan’s preferred wife), the Taj Mahal has become not just one of India’s most recognizable structures but also a monument that depicts the beauty and majesty of the love shared between the Shah and his Queen.

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The magnificence of the Taj Mahal’s design becomes most apparent at sunrise and sunset. Depending on where one is observing from, the sun’s rays will reflect off the mausoleum’s ivory-white marble, putting on a colorful display of brilliance. The best place to catch the sunset show is in the Moonlight Garden facing the Taj’s northern walls from across the Yamuna River.

40. A Floating Post Office

Found in: Dal Lake, Jammu, and Kashmir
Est. Cost: Unknown

In the Kashmir Valley of Northeast India, you will almost certainly stumble across the quiet city of Srinagar and the fascinating village located on Dal Lake. You heard correctly. There is a community that has been living in homemade houseboats on the lake for hundreds of years. Like other cities and villages, those who live on Dal Lake also receive mail.

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It’s unlikely that UPS or DHL will provide door to boat delivery, however, Dal Lake is home to the world’s only floating post office. And it’s been keeping the residents of the Dal Lake floating village in touch with the rest of the world for more than 200 years.

41. Banks With No Locks

Found in: Shani Shingnapur, Maharashtra
Est. Cost: N/A

In a world where trust is earned and fear of theft has run rampant, a village exists that is about 170 miles east of Mumbai named Shani Shingnapur. In this village, the people have faith that Shani (the “divine personification of the planet Saturn” in the Hindu faith) will protect them from harm and their possessions from theft. 

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In order to show commitment to their faith and belief in Shani’s protective nature, the villagers of Shani Shingnapur go through life without locking the doors to their houses, shops, or even the village’s bank. Then again, it might be a little difficult when none of the buildings, including the bank, has locks on their doors.

42. Spit Inspectors

Found in: Various Cities
Est. Cost: $65*

In recent years, cleaning up the cities (literally) has become a major focus for local Indian governments. Matching the Singaporean government’s example, in 2008, India made it illegal to spit or cause any other type of public nuisance with origins coming from the human body. “Nuisance Detectors” have even been deployed on the streets in order to enforce the new laws.

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If you have a momentary lapse in judgment and forget about the public nuisance laws that also target public defecators and urinators, you could be the recipient of a $65 fine. Just be glad that you didn’t end up with the alternative punishment of up to 6 months in prison.

43. Bottle Recycling

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: $0.01* / Bottle

Although it’s not a new concept in India, recycling is not something that very many people practice. Alternatively, instead of tossing bottles and jars into their respective bins, similar to the trash, they got thrown on the streets, sidewalks, and pretty much everywhere else.

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And then there are these guys who ride around the streets on a cart that’s pulled by a donkey, collecting all the bottles they could possibly carry (and then some) in one haul and returning them for 1 rupee apiece. How they navigate safely through the roads of the bigger cities is still something of a mystery.

44. A Twin Town

Found in: Kodinhi, Kerala
Est. Cost: N/A

Having twins is not all that common. It’s even rarer to have an identical set. Twins have long been one of the many mysteries of life, and although modern science has found many answers, the selection process as to who will have two children in one go is still a little fuzzy.

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Except in two small Indian villages: In Kodinhi (a village of 2,000 people), 42 out of every 1000 births end with twins being born. The only place in the world with a higher rate is another of India’s villages, Mohammedpur Umri (close to Allahabad), where 120 of the 900 residents of Mohammedpur Umri is a twin.

45. Chickpea, Saffron, and Chili Dunkin’ Donuts

Found in: Dunkin’ Donuts Nationwide
Est. Cost: $1.25*

Opening an American fast-food chain in another country involves years of preparation that includes a tremendous amount of market research — much of which is done in order to determine what the local palate is partial to. Of course, when it comes to flavors, India has a wide range that has been untapped elsewhere in the world.

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In India, McDonald’s may have gone with the McCurry, but Dunkin’ Donuts decided to inject an authentic taste of India into its Diwali donuts. The Kesar Dadam donut has almond milk and saffron, and crushed pistachios. The Son Papdi is a flaky pastry coated with chickpea flour. And most intriguing of all, the guava and chili-topped white chocolate donut. Now that’s what we call a journey to flavor-town.

46. Carpooling with a Monkey

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

If you haven’t come to realize it quite yet, India is a very different type of place. Many things occur there that Westerners have a tough time wrapping their minds around, like carpooling with a monkey, for instance.

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Monkeys jump onto the back of motorcycles, cars, buses, and trains more often than you could imagine. Some of the furry primates are looking for a ride across town, but most are just interested in getting into some monkey business. If you’re ever in a situation where a monkey decides to hitch a ride, act natural, and eventually, it will go on its way.

47. Dining with the Dead

Found in: Ahmedabad
Est. Cost: Varies

Any ‘Deadites’ or ‘Walking Deaders’ out there will get a kick out of this next place. To date, there have been no accounts of zombie attacks, nor have there been reports of any evil spirits taking possession of those recently passed. However, if either event were to occur in real life, The New Lucky restaurant in Ahmedabad would probably be the place they’d happen.

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You won’t be eating an Outback Steakhouse quality meal at The New Lucky restaurant, but you will be dining at a table that sits amongst the graves of the Sufi saint on top of a 16th-century Muslim cemetery, or so it’s believed.

48. Fabric Shopping With a Bull

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

The cow is a sacred and revered creature in India. As such, there are no limits to what the bovines are allowed to do or where they are permitted to go. Due to their status, it wouldn’t be out of the ordinary to bump into one of these large herbivores while out shopping for everyday things.

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While it’s most common to see them strolling through the streets, receiving gifts of flowers and food from the locals, bulls have sometimes been spotted inside fabric shops as well. Perhaps they’re drawn to the reds and pinks of the shop’s fine garments.

49. World’s Only Floating Lake

Found in: Loktak Lake, Manipur
Est. Cost: N/A

The floating lake of Manipur has been an essential part of the town’s survival for hundreds of years. Not only have fishermen been exploiting its waters, but it also serves as Manipur’s main source of drinking water and, more recently, hydropower.

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The plentiful masses of decaying vegetation found within Loktak Lake have worked their way to the surface and formed small landmasses or phumdis. The largest of the lake’s phumdis, Keibul Lama National Park, is an incredible 15-square-miles, and the last place on Earth where the Brow-Antlered deer of Manipur still live in the wild.

50. Packed Trains

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: $1.30-$50*

Riding the rails in India is an experience that can’t be understood until it’s been experienced firsthand. If you’re looking to ride in ‘comfort,’ a one-way ticket from Dubai will set you back close to fifty dollars. However, if you don’t mind a tight squeeze, the same trip could be made for as little as a buck-thirty.

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On an Indian train, a tight squeeze is precisely that. Commuters in the ‘cattle car’ class spend their journeys huddled shoulder-to-shoulder with a complete stranger. Not even the roofs of the trains are safe from over-crowding — they could sometimes be seen hosting dozens of passengers.

51. Massively Hot Peppers

Found in: Northeast India 
Est. Cost: $10.45 per pound*

If you’re someone who winces at too-spicy Taco Bell, then the bhut jolokia is definitely not for you. The ghost pepper, as its known, is cultivated specifically in Northeast India, and it is monstrously hot. It is 170x times hotter than Tabasco sauce, with a rating of over 1 million Scoville Heat Units.

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Yes, people do eat these, both as food and spice. It is commonly used with pork or dried fish. Additionally, these peppers are used in smoke bombs to keep wild elephants at bay. In competitive pepper-eating contests, the bhut jolokia is a common sight that makes steam come out of tasters’ ears.

52. Snake Charming

Found in: Towns/Festivals in India 
Est. Cost: $0 to watch*

Though snake charming is nearly extinct in India, you can find it during festivals and in small towns and villages. Most snake charmers are wandering performers, traveling from town to town to show off their snake-hypnotism skills. Snake charmers play a pungi instrument to distract the snakes.

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That’s not all this performance entails. You’ll also find juggling, sleight of hand, and other tricks up these performers’ sleeves. In some cities in India, like Bedia, government officials have tried to outlaw snake charming. But, many Indian snake charmers have defied laws in the name of practicing this traditional art form.

53. Biking with a Donkey

Found in: Nationwide  
Est. Cost: $1,045-$1,306*

Hey, sometimes donkeys get tired too. Though they are considered everyone’s pack mules, in India, it seems that donkeys don’t always have to do all the work. In this photo, two Indian men are riding a motorbike with a donkey in tow.

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There are 112,000 donkeys in India, at least according to a livestock consensus in 2019. Believe it or not, that number is a decline of nearly two-thirds when compared to a prior census conducted in 2012. If you want a donkey in India, be prepared to shell out some cash. A good donkey costs between $1,045 and $1,306.

54. Busy Outdoor Air Markets

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: N/A

Open-air markets are a fun thing to do in Asia, and they are a must-see for both tourists and locals alike. India has a lot of these markets, including this one in Beawar, Rajasthan. Though this Beawar market looks like it is bustling, it is not the busiest in India. That honor goes to the open-air market in Chandni Chowk, Delhi.

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This is one of India’s oldest, busiest air markets, dating back to the seventeenth century. You can buy pretty much anything you want there, as there are endless stalls of food and shops selling spices, art, souvenirs, electronics, jewelry, and more. 

55. Seafood Treasure

Found in: London, England 
Est. Cost: $2,510*

Most of us have eaten seafood before, but never like this. The “Samundari Khazana,” also known as the Seafood Treasure, is the most expensive plate of seafood in the world. The Bombay Brasserie serves this curry, which costs more than most people’s rent payment.

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For a Seafood Treasure, you’ll pay $2,510. The dish contains pricy ingredients like Abalone Sea Snails, Devon Crab, Italian White Truffle, quail eggs filled with Beluga Caviar, Scottish Lobster, and edible gold valued at over $1,000 for ten grams. The chef, Prahlad Hegde, says that he based the recipe of this expensive curry on one he learned from his mother. The only difference is that he is using some of the world’s most expensive, lavish ingredients. Though located in London, the owners and chefs are from India. 

56. 700-year-old Fort Turned Luxury Resort

Found in: Rajasthan
Est. Cost: $1,083 per night*

The Six Senses Fort Barwara, located in Rajasthan, is a 700-year-old fort that became a luxury resort in 2021. Fort Barwara was once owned by a wealthy, noble Rajasthani family, and a descendant from that family worked with Six Senses to restore the six-acre property and its palaces and temples into a modern resort.

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The one-bedroom suites at Six Senses Fort Barwara start at $1,083, and the pricier, larger suites feature rooftop terraces and pools. Roohani is the hotel’s signature restaurant, and it uses ingredients from neighboring farms and the hotel’s local organic garden to serve up dishes inspired by the Rajasthani royalty. 

57. 12 Million Dollar Wedding Dress

Found in: Mumbai
Est. Cost: $12 million*

Isha Ambani is the daughter of billionaire Mukesh Ambani, who has a net worth of nearly $100 billion. Isha never shies away from the finer things in life, and her $12 million wedding dress was proof of that. Her palatial wedding to Anand Piramal in 2018 cost $100 million, and even Beyonce performed at the event.

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Isha’s diamond-and-gold dress contained a sixteen-paneled lehenga with a train. Every panel was hand-embroidered, and each flower was decked out with crystals and sequins. The finishing touch of this pricy dress was Isha’s wedding sari, which once belonged to her mother, Nita.  

58. Catching Rides with Rickshaws

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $1.60 for a ride*

Though you’d have to be pretty brave to skateboard with a rickshaw like this woman, that mode of transportation is available for everyone, skateboarder or not. In India, rickshaws are a common way to get around. These eco-friendly vehicles are lead passenger vehicles in India. Some have motors, while others are powered by good old-fashioned leg strength.

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These tuk-tuks cost $1,000-$2,500 to purchase, though a ride costs just a fraction of that (especially if you’re tagging along for free like this woman). Rickshaw drivers earn between $9.14 and $13.05 per day, pedaling people through the streets of Indian cities and towns. 

59. Reincarnation Warning Sign

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: N/A

Religious beliefs all over the world are interesting and unique. Everyone believes in something different, and, in India, if you follow Hinduism, you likely believe in reincarnation. This key belief means that your soul is indestructible, taking on different bodies until you achieve moksha, a relief from the process.

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Though this is a religious view, Indians do have a sense of humor. One person came up with this very funny sign warning people that, unless they believe strongly in rebirth, they should not come any closer. The warning is too hilarious not to include on this list, though we do wonder whether the danger cautioned against really is a tiger. 

60. The Lake Palace

Found in: Udaipur, Rajasthan 
Est. Cost: $425 per night*

Located in Udaipur, Rajasthan, the Lake Palace, also called Jag Niwas, was constructed in the 1740s. This beautiful, ethereal palace looks like something out of a fantasy movie, but it is 100% real. The Lake Palace is located in the middle of Lake Pichola, and it has a natural foundation spanning four acres.

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Inside this white palace, the walls are constructed of black-and-white marble and adorned with ornaments and precious stones. In its courtyards are fountains, pillared terraces, and gardens. The Lake Palace has been restored several times, and former guests of this beautiful abode include Jackie Kennedy, Queen Elizabeth II, the Shah of Iran, Vivien Leigh, and the King of Nepal.

61. The Lotus Temple

Found in: Delhi
Est. Cost: $10 million to build*

This Bahai House of Worship is the Mashriqu’l-Adhkhar, better-known as the Lotus Temple. Shaped like a beautiful white flower, this temple opened in the mid-1980s. It is dedicated to the oneness of humanity, and followers of any religion are welcome to gather and worship for free. It is one of Delhi’s most prominent attractions.

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The Lotus Temple cost $10 million to construct, all of which was donated by Ardeshir Rustampur. An Iranian architect named Fariborz designed the marble temple. It took him nearly ten years to finish the project, but it was worth it, as the holy site now averages 10,000 visitors per day. 

62. World’s Most Expensive Silk Sari

Found in: Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu
Est. Cost: $100,021*

The Guinness Book of World Records, the bastion of all things excessive and amazing, named this the most expensive sari in the world. As you may or may not know, the sari is a traditional Indian garment, and they cost about $80 for a good-quality piece.

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This sari far surpasses that amount, as Guinness reported that it costs $100,021. Made by Chennai Silks in Kancheepuram, this sari contains images of eleven different paintings by Raja Ravi Varma, a celebrated Indian artist. The main image on the sari, painted in exquisite detail, is “Galaxy of Musicians,” Varma’s most well-known work. 

63. Shukavana Bird Home

Found in: Mysuru 
Est. Cost: $0 to visit*

Another record-setter for Guinness is the Shukavana Bird Sanctuary, which set the record for the most species in one aviary. The aviary is 165 feet tall, and it is a “free flight” aviary where you can see its 2,100 colorful residents flittering about. Of those residents, there are 468 different species.

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Dr. Sri Swamiji, head of Mysuru’s Avadhoota Datta Peetham, founded the one-acre property to protect endangered birds. Dr. Swamiji feels strongly about conservation and animal welfare, and the aviary is attached to a large bird hospital, where the doctor and volunteers treat sick and injured birds of all species. 

64. Cows Visiting McDonald’s

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: N/A

Cows are sacred in India, so no one is going to tell them no if they want some French fries. These cows are walking casually past an Indian McDonald’s, and, though that would certainly turn some heads in America, it is commonplace in India.

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There are tons of cows on the streets in India. In Hinduism, one of the main religions of the country, cows are sacred and protected. A cow is a living representation of “divine and natural beneficence,” according to Britannica. There are more than 300 million of these friendly, lumbering animals in the country. However, there are only 160 McDonald’s there, so they’ll probably have to wait in line.

65. The “King” of Rubies: the Rajaratna Ruby

Found in: Bangalore 
Est. Cost: $200 million*

The Rajaratna Ruby is the undisputed King of Rubies. Located in Bangalore, this ruby is owned by G. Vidyaraj, and it is a 2,475-carat gem in a cabochon cut. The regal ruby is one of the largest of its kind, and its six-star “asterism” pattern is completely unique.

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The Rajaratna Ruby can be traced back to medieval India, where it is believed to have originated from Kalinga or Kalpur. It wound up in the hands of the King of Vijayanagar, the leader of a prosperous empire in South India. Over the years, the Rajaratna Ruby has changed hands, and its value has only increased. It is priced at $200 million currently, and its current owner has it locked away in a heavily-secured vault.  

66. The Golden Temple

Found in: Punjab 
Est. Cost: $6.53 million to build*

The Golden Temple is one of the most beautiful structures in the world, and it is safe to say that it is the crown jewel of India’s Punjab region. The Temple has a full golden dome constructed with 882 pounds of gold leaf. The Golden Temple is a sacred pilgrimage spot for people following the Sikh religion.

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Every day, more than 100,000 people visit the shrine to worship, and people of all religions are welcome. The Temple was completed in 1589, and it has been through a lot of civil unrest, yet it has managed to survive throughout the ages as a beacon of hope.   

67. Touching of Feet

Found in: Nationwide
Est. Cost: N/A

Sometimes, other cultures have traditions that may seem unusual to us, but, in that culture, they are commonplace. In India, there is a practice called Charan Sparsh. In this practice, younger Indians touch the feet of their elders to seek their blessings. It is a sign of respect in the Hindu religion.

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According to Hinduism, when you touch the feet of your elder, you will be blessed with strength, intellect, knowledge, and even fame. This is a common gesture in India, and it is an important one. Though unusual in the West, not touching your elders’ feet is a social faux-pas in India.  

68. Hampi

Found in: Karnataka 
Est. Cost: $177 for a tour package*

In the year 1500 A.D., Hampi was the capital of the Vijayanagar Empire.  At the time, it was the world’s second-largest city, and Hampi was crowded with merchants, civilians, military members, and pretty much anyone who was important at the time. Now, this ancient village is a collection of ruins and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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The ancient temples, monuments, and forts are spread over an area of 4,200 acres. Hampi is not totally abandoned, as the Indian city is still home to the revived Hampi Bazaar as well as the Daroji Bear Sanctuary, which the Indian sloth bear calls home. 

69. World’s Largest Roti

Found in: Jamnagar 
Est. Cost: Unknown

Roti is a delicious flatbread that was invented in India. Traditionally, roti is made rom gehu ka atta (stoneground wheat flour) and water. When you combine it into a dough, roti becomes a must-have staple of Indian cuisine. Though roti can be found nationwide, it is in Jamnagar that you can find the largest roti in the world.

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Made by chef Dagdu Mahotsav, this roti weighs 319 pounds, 10 ounces. The chefs who made this roti set out to do in a formal event, arranged by Bharatsinh Parmar, in 2012. With a lot of hard work and dedication, they were able to achieve this record-breaking feat. 

70. Watching TV While Boating

Found in: Unknown
Est. Cost: N/A 

Boating is about relaxing, so why not kick back and watch some TV, as this person did? A lot of India’s major cities are jam-packed with people on motorbikes, rickshaws, and even donkeys. If you want a break from the hustle and bustle and want to see the serene side of India, it’s advisable that you travel by boat.

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We’re not sure where this man is sailing, but one of the best places to visit by boat in India is the aquarium of Bhimtal Town. You have to traverse Bhimtal Lake to see this aquarium, which is located right in the middle of the body of water. There, you’ll find many different species of sea creatures that will make your jaw drop.

71. Falcon Supernova iPhone 6 Pink Diamond

Found in: Mumbai 
Est. Cost: $48.5 million*

While iPhones aren’t exactly cheap, the Falcon Supernova iPhone 6 Pink Diamond is something else. Made by Falcon, an American luxury brand, this iPhone 6 costs $48.5 million dollars. In it, you’ll find 24-carat gold, platinum, and rose gold, which come together to make a smartphone unlike any other.

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So, who owns this precious iPhone? As it turns out, Nita Ambani, wife of billionaire Mukesh Ambani, owns the Falcon Supernova iPhone 6 Pink Diamond. Though Ambani owns the phone, she doesn’t use it every day, and it’s easy to understand why. You definitely wouldn’t want to drop a $50 million iPhone and crack its screen.

72. Driving Buses on Water

Found in: Tamil Nadu 
Est. Cost: $1-$5 per ferry ride*

This photo is an interesting way to get across the water. Located in Tamil Nadu, India, a common way to cross the shallow sea to get from Rameshwaram to Dhanushkodi is via yellow mini-bus. Though this bus looks like something you’d see driving kids to school (on land), it appears to have been turned into a maritime vehicle.

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Those traveling to Dhanushkodi are likely tourists, as the town is abandoned. Unfortunately, the majority of the town was destroyed in a cyclone in 1964. Only a few restaurants and vendors, catering to tourists coming to look at the eerie, uninhabited town, can be spotted during the day in Dhanushkodi.

73. The Levitating Stone

Found in: Shivapur, Maharashtra
Est. Cost: N/A 

This is perhaps the most unique item on this list. The Levitating Stone, as its known, is located in Shivapur, Maharashtra, and it draws hundreds of tourists to the area every day. The ancient stone weighs 154 pounds, and it can be traced back to the time of a Muslim Sufi named Qamar Ali Darvesh, who lived 700 years ago.

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The legend has it that eleven men can lift the stone above their heads with just their index fingers by shouting the name of Darvesh. This has fascinated Indian Muslims for hundreds of years, though naysayers believe the “miracle” is really a gimmick.

74. The Magnetic Hill

Found in: Magnetic Hill, Ladakh
Est. Cost: N/A 

Everyone loves a good optical illusion, and Magnetic Hill, located near the town of Leh in Ladakh, is exactly that. Magnetic Hill is a “gravity hill,” which means that the layout of the land surrounding it produces an optical illusion that makes a hill’s slopes look wonky.

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This means that, though Magnetic Hill is a downhill road, it looks as though it is going uphill. Cars traversing the hill look as though they are in defiance of gravity, even though they’re actually going downhill. This mysterious, fascinating spot is one of many “gravity hills” that have fascinated people for thousands of years.

75. Gold Dry-Fruit Mithai

Found in: Surat, Gujarat 
Est. Cost: $118 per 2.2 lbs.*

Mithai is a Hindu word, and it refers to Indian sweets that are made from flour, sugar, milk, and nuts and flavored with cardamom, saffron, and rosewater (Mithai is also the name of a Bollywood romance movie about a young woman who sells desserts and falls for the son of a wealthy family).

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Mithai is cheap to buy for the most part, but, in a shop is Surat, Gujarat, there is a type of mithai that is the pinnacle of luxury. This 24-Karat Mithai is covered in pricey gold leaf foil, and it costs $118 per kilogram. Originally, this treat was created for the 2018 Raksha Bandhan Celebrations, and it was so popular that the Surat shop kept it around. 

76. Humanoid Vyommitra

Found in: Bengaluru 
Est. Cost: $1.291 million* (Total Gaganyaan Program Cost)

This humanoid robot is named Vyommitra, and it is designed to look as eerily-lifelike as possible. Her name, when translated to English, means “Space Friend.” This ‘bot was created by the Indian Space Research Organization, and she will eventually board the Gaganyaan. Vyommitra will take her place on the spacecraft with a crew.

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The ISRO does not want to fly animals into space the way other nations have, and humanoid robots like Vyommitra allow them to see what radiation and weightlessness do to the human body in an ethical way. On uncrewed Gaganyaan missions, Vyommitra will perform microgravity experiments, simulate human functions, and monitor module parameters. 

77. Coal Museum

Found in: Margherita, Assam
Est. Cost: $0 to visit*

The Coal Heritage and Park Museum, located in Assam, looks into the state’s long history with fossil fuels. Coal mining is a huge livelihood for people who live there, and Coal India Ltd., which operates in Assam, is the world’s largest coal producer.

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People interested in mining history will appreciate the Coal Museum, as it contains relics from trains, WWII artifacts, and the history of Assam Railways & Trading Co. Real-time models depict how coal is mined, and there are real models of circuit breakers, haulages, and transformers made by Manchester & Sheffield and Crompton Parkinson. 

78. Precariously Stacked Corn Delivery

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: $3.8 billion* (Value of Corn Industry in India)

You definitely don’t want to be driving behind this truck, lest you get a windshield full of corn. Though this isn’t quite as terrifying as the wooden logs from Final Destination, it’s still quite precarious. This truck has piled its corn sky-high, in apparent defiance of gravity as it takes the produce from one point to another.

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India is a major corn producer, ranking fourth in area and seventh in production. India represents two percent of the world’s corn production, as well as four percent of the world’s maize area, with 9.2 million hectares in the country solely devoted to corn.

79. Decorated Buses

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $500-$1,000 to paint*

We’re used to plain, bland buses with the “PORT AUTHORITY” logo on them in America, but Indian buses appear to be far more fun (also, they let people hang off the sides). India’s painted buses and trucks have been the subject of many travel photographers, and it is easy to see why.

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Beautiful, intricate patterns with animals and flowers cover every inch of the vehicles, which are custom-built to handle décor. According to CNN, this psychedelic truck art is often painted by truckers who miss their “kids and wives,” decorating their buses and trucks to “remind them of home.” 

80. Guhantara Cave Resort

Found in: Bangalore 
Est. Cost: $65 per night to stay*

One of the most unique places to stay in India is the Guhantara Cave Resort. This Bangalore abode is an underground hotel that takes people back in time while still remaining luxurious. The rooms range from “Primitive” to “Suite,” and each is uniquely decorated. They are all underground, so claustrophobics might want to skip this one.

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The man-made cave resort has an in-house restaurant, as well as games like table tennis, board games, snooker, and carom. You can choose from a day outing or stay overnight, and Guhantara has been described as a family-friendly, fun, and affordable vacation. 

81. Tobacco-Free Village

Found in: Shankarpura, Haryana
Est. Cost: N/A

Smoking is an Indian tradition, and the village of Shankarpura chose to break from that age-old hobby by declaring the village tobacco-free. According to town officials, Shankarpura is Sikh, and the Sikh religion bans the use of tobacco. Village elders have taken to this anti-smoking trend, with one telling IBN Live that he “feel[s] young” and is “free from disease,” with no need for “doctors.”

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Shankarpura’s religious views have made the town healthier, and the town has a world-class football team, likely as a result of the youth keeping their lungs healthy. Perhaps towns all over the world should follow Shankarpura’s example. 

82. Cooking Pot Rickshaw

Found in: Ahmedabad, Gujarat  
Est. Cost: $1.60 per ride*

India is a land of unique travel options, and, though unconventional, these options seem to work very well. One idea that an inventive traveler had was to take a large cooking pot and use it as a seat in a rickshaw. Judging from the photo, people can lay back in the pot while the rickshaw, a popular mode of Indian transportation, takes them to their destination.

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The young man in this photo is kicking back in a cooking pot in Ahmedabad as he is rushed through the busy city. Ahmedabad is one of the largest cities in India, and it is the home of mouth-watering cuisine, diamond cutting, and colorful cotton textiles.

83. The Jal Mahal

Found in: Jaipur, Rajasthan 
Est. Cost: $0 to visit*

Meaning “water palace”, Jal Hal is a unique tourist attraction as it’s built in the middle of a lake. The palace was built in 1699, and, a century later, Jai Singh II of Amber renovated the building and lake, turning it into an even grander palace.

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The Jal Mahal is secluded completely from the land, and it is constructed entirely in red sandstone. It is a grand showcase of Rajput architecture, and four of the building’s five floors are completely underwater when the lake is filled up. As you can imagine, restoration on this is ongoing and expensive, with the latest renovations costing over $129 million.

84. Biometric ID Cards For Cows

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $7.81 million*

India loves its cows, and the animals are considered sacred in the country, thanks to the Hindu religion. The Indian government even moved to issue high-tech biometric ID cards to the country’s livestock. This plan would help the government keep track of India’s cows and protect them from gangs smuggling livestock.

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It would also help India take care of abandoned cows and manage cow shelters. The Indian government plans to spend $7.81 million to tag forty million cows with a twelve-digit, unique ID number, much in the same way it has plans to develop unique IDs for India’s people. 

85. $78 Canned Butter Chicken

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $78*

Butter chicken is a traditional Indian dish. Called Murgh Makhani, this curry is made from chicken with butter sauce and spiced tomato seasoning. It has a rich texture, and the cream often makes the sauce silky smooth. Though this dish originated in Northern India, it has become popular nationwide, especially when eaten with naan.

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Though usually affordable, there is a $78 butter chicken in Anarkali, Hyderabad. This chicken recipe took eight years to create, and it is made with Evian spring water, black olives, Godrej chicken, Danish Lurpak butter, and Filippo Berio olive oil. The dish is packed into a Borosil glass carton so that its flavor is contained. As a result of this packaging and ingredients, this dish is quite expensive. 

86. The Caracella Club

Found in: New Delhi
Est. Cost: $1.5 million to build*

There are quite a few inverted buildings in the world, and the topsy-turvy Caracella Club is one of them. It was opened in New Delhi, and it is in a residential area, consisting of 700 apartments. When the Club was first opened, 80% of the apartments sold immediately.

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The Caracella Club took its name from the world’s first club, constructed by the ancient Romans. The exterior looks like the building is tipping over, and, inside its residents have access to amenities like a spa, gym, restaurant, salon, banquet area, pool table, and T.T. room. The total cost to build this architectural wonder was around $1.5 million.

87. Murg Donald’s

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: N/A 

There is McDonald’s in India, and we’re sure it is only a matter of time before this “Murg Donald’s,” pictured here, gets a strongly-worded letter for stepping on the fast-food giant’s toes. We wonder if this knockoff McDonald’s sells the same food.

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In the country, there are 160 McDonald’s and probably only one Murg Donald’s. At the real Mickey-D’s, you won’t find the usual Big Macs that you’re used to. There, interesting menu items include a lot of vegetarian options such as the McAloo Tikki Burger, made from a spiced potato filling. The McAloo accounts for one-quarter of Indian McDonald’s total sales.

88. Living Roots Bridge

Found in: Common in Meghalaya 
Est. Cost: N/A 

This beautiful, natural sight is formed using tree shaping. Living root bridges are very common in Meghalaya, a Northeast Indian state. The Jaintia and Khasi peoples in this mountainous terrain hand make these bridges by shaping the aerial roots of Ficus elastica (rubber fig) trees into a living bridge.

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So long as the tree from which the roots grow remains healthy and well-cared-for, the bridge will grow in strength over time. New roots need to be pruned and shaped to make the bridge stronger. A fully-mature living root bridge can handle as many as fifty or more people crossing over it.

89. Bullet Baba Shrine

Found in: Jodhpur, Rajasthan 
Est. Cost: $0.13 to visit the shrine*

Bullet Baba, also known as “Om Banna” or “The Motorcycle God,” is one of India’s more unique deities. The legend has it that in 1988, Bullet Baba was traveling from one town to another when he lost control of his motorcycle, hitting a tree and perishing on the spot. When local police impounded the motorcycle, they found that the motorcycle mysteriously disappeared from lockup that night and wound up at the site of the accident the next day.

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No matter how many times Bullet Baba’s bike was impounded, it found its way back to the site the next day. Amazed at this miracle, the local population began to worship the bike. There is now a temple, the Bullet Baba Shrine, dedicated to those worshiping Om Banna and asking him for safe travels.

90. Painted Trucks

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $500-$1,000 to paint*

We’ve seen painted buses on Indian roads, and, as mentioned, there are also painted rucks. The Bedford trucks in India are covered with elaborate and intricate paintings. Though drivers do, according to CNN, paint their trucks to remind themselves of their families back home, that is not the only reason.

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Vox says that these truck drivers also paint their vehicles for safety reasons. After all, the bright, beautiful coloring makes them stand out. Also, the images and words “motivate” other drivers, keeping their spirits up and blessing them during “long, brutal work hours.” In India, there are five million drivers who transport two-thirds of the country’s cargo every day, often for low wages and long hours.

91. Double Decker Auto Rickshaws

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: $1.60 per ride*

Only in India will you see double-decker tuk-tuks quite like this. This double-decker rickshaw helps make drivers more money, as they can take more passengers at once. Rickshaw rides cost around $1.60 per person if you’re a tourist (locals often can ride for cheaper), so a ride on this double-decker can make them over $3 a ride.

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The only downside is that there are no stairs to get you to the top level, so you’re going to have to ask the rickshaw driver for a leg-up. Though this vehicle is likely a big investment, it’ll surely pay off for this driver in time, no matter how wacky it looks.

92. Water With H2O

Found in: Bengaluru
Est. Cost: $1.29 per bottle*

As someone joked, what was in the water before? This hilarious sign now advertises water with a special new ingredient—H20. We’re not sure what that means or whether H20 means something different in India, but this photo made the rounds on social media as people couldn’t help but laugh.

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Nandi Aqua has been around since 2008, selling water to people from its home base in Bengaluru. The ad was probably in Bengalaru, as Nandi Aqua supplies packaged drinking water to people who live “in and around” there, according to the company. They might want to hire a new ad campaigner. 

93. Mangustan (Mangosteen)

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $3.11 per pound*

For a while, this fruit was banned in America, as officials were afraid that it would introduce the Asian fruit fly into America. This exotic, tropical fruit is now permitted here, but it has to be irradiated first to get rid of any dreaded insects that could be lurking.

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The mangosteen is a tropical fruit with a flavor that is a mixture of sweet and sour. According to Healthline, this is a “nutrient-dense” food that may “potentially” boost our immune health and reduce inflammation. According to a study posted to the National Institute of Health website, mangosteen might even help with diarrhea and skin infections, as it has antimicrobial properties.

94. Not A Volkswagen

Found in: Somewhere in India
Est. Cost: $1.60 per ride*

This hilarious sign shows that the jokes behind public transport are global. One rickshaw driver has a sign on the back of his auto saying, “I couldn’t afford a Volkswagen. Thus, auto,” referring to customers who take public transportation instead of their own vehicle.

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It’s a fun jest, and there are a lot of people in India who take public transportation who probably had a good laugh at the rickshaw ad. Rickshaw driving is a booming business. A count in 2018 measured the number of auto-rickshaws (battery-powered, three-wheeled ones) in the country at 1.5 million.

95. Knock-Off KFC

Found in: Delhi 
Est. Cost: $1.94 per meal*

McDonald’s isn’t the only fast-food restaurant in India with a copycat. Sardar’s Fish and Chicken, complete with an almost-Colonel-Sanders-like figurehead, seemingly has taken a page from KFC’s book in terms of its presentation and ads.

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Located in Delhi, this restaurant appears well-liked, as it has a 4.7/5 on Google and a 4/5 on Zomato. The food is strictly North Indian cuisine, and you can also snag Tandoori snacks at Sardar’s, too. Not to knock Kentucky Fried Chicken, but we have a feeling that Sardar’s might be a bit healthier than that beloved American establishment. 

96. Nohkalikai Falls, Meghalaya

Found in: Cherrapunji, Meghalaya 
Est. Cost: N/A

Nohkalikai Falls is one of the most beautiful natural attractions in India, and it is the country’s tallest plunge waterfall, with a height of 1,115 feet. Located in Meghalaya near Cherrapunji, the waters of Nohkalikai come from rainwater that collects on the summit of a small plateau from March to November.

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At the base of the plunge is a pool with a unique, all-natural green shade of water. There is a grisly local legend behind Nohkalikai that is not for the faint of heart (or stomach). Tourists interested in seeing the natural wonders of India should consider a visit to Nohkalikai Falls.  

97. The Hanging Pillar

Found in: LepakshiAndhra Pradesh  
Est. Cost: $0 to visit*

The Lepakshi Temple, located in Andhra Pradesh, is a sixteenth-century Veerabhadra temple that features intricate sculptures of deities, dancers, and musicians, as well as paintings and frescoes that depict epic stories from the Puranas, Ramayana, and Mahabharata. Beautiful though these features are, they are not Lepakshi’s claim to fame.

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There are seventy pillars in the temple, including one hanging from the ceiling. There is a paper-thin gap between the pillar and the ground. The pillar is slightly dislodged from when a British engineer attempted to move it to find out the secret of its support (happily, he was unsuccessful and the Hanging Pillar remains a mystery).  

98. World’s Largest Monolithic Statue

Found in: Shravanabelagola, Karnataka
Est. Cost: $125 for a private, guided tour of the statue*

The Gommateshwara Statue is the world’s largest monolithic statue, with a height of fifty-seven feet. It stands tall on the Vindhyagiri Hill in Karnataka, and it is carved from just one single granite block. You can see it from over eighteen miles away; that’s how large it is.

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Gommateshwara was constructed in 983 A.D. as a monument to Bahubali, a Jainism figure that symbolizes peace, the sacrifice of worldly possessions, non-violence, and simple living. Every twelve years, Gommateshawara is anointed with a mix of saffron, ghee, milk, and sugarcane juice during the Mahamastakabhisheka Festival. Indologists credit this religious ceremony as the reason behind the statue’s great condition after over 1,000 years.

99. Rambagh Palace

Found in: Jaipur, Rajasthan 
Est. Cost: $1.47 million to build*

The Rambagh Palace is one of India’s most expensive hotels, and it costs over $400 per night for a regular room there. Located in Rajasthan, Rambagh Palace cost millions of rupees to build, and it contains gardens, artwork, mosaics, chandeliers, a golf course, and more.

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It is the former residence of Sir Samuel Swinton Jacob, and it is now an asset owned by Taj Hotels Group. The building’s first residence was constructed in 1835, and it wasn’t until the early 1900s that Sir Jacob expanded it into a palace. Adjusting for inflation, the cost to build the Rambagh Palace was well over $1 million. 

100. The Road to Kottayam Is That Way?

Found in: Near Kottayam 
Est. Cost: N/A 

India isn’t always known for its clear road instructions, and there are a lot of signs in the country that are a bit confusing. This one is a good example, as it will leave you scratching your head and wondering where exactly Kottayam is. The city is either East, West, or North, and you’ll have to try each one individually to find out where.

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Assuming you do find Kottayam, you’re in luck, as the Indian city was the first in the country to achieve total literacy. 80% of the books published in the state of Kerala come from Kottayam. In addition to its reputation as a book lover’s heaven, Kottayam is also home to massive rubber plantations, spice gardens, and wide stretches of paddy fields. 

101. An Elephant Spa

Found in: Kerala 
Est. Cost: Free for elephants 

Humans aren’t the only ones who need a little self-care from time to time. In Kerala, India, elephants are treated to pampering spa treatments at the Punnathoor Cotta Elephant Yard. Located in Kerala, this elephant spa operates during India’s hottest month—July.

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There, elephants can experience, free of charge, lavish baths, carefully-selected diets, and soothing massages. Locals around the Elephant Yard, which is attached to a Hindu temple, happily volunteer to clean the elephant’s bellies and hard-to-reach spots. These spoiled giants live the life of luxury at this sanctuary, which hosts up to fifty-nine elephants at a time. 

102. The World’s Biggest Gathering

Found in: Allahabad, Ujjain, Nashik, and Haridwar 
Est. Cost: Varies 

Kumbh Mela is a festival that is celebrated once every twelve years, and it is a huge pilgrimage in the Hindu religion. Kumbh Mela is celebrated so infrequently because that is the timing of every revolution that Brihaspati completes in Hinduism. There are four river-bank pilgrimage sites, Ujjain, Nashik, Haridwar, and Allahabad.

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It is the world’s largest gathering, too, as two-hundred-million people celebrate Kumbh Mela every year. On the festival’s busiest day, it welcomes fifty million people. At the festival, there is food, fun, dancing, games, and discussions about Hinduism. People have been celebrating Kumbh Mela as early as 644 C.E. 

103. Extravagant Weddings

Found in: Rajasthan, mostly 
Est. Cost: $100 million* (Piramal-Ambani Wedding Cost)

In India, over twelve million weddings take place a year, and it is estimated that the wedding industry in India is worth $40-$50 billion. Half the gold bought in India every year is used for wedding ceremonies. Elites in the country love lavish celebrations, and the Piramal-Ambani wedding was the epitome of a huge blowout affair, as Beyonce even performed at the event for a fee of $3 million.

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Rajasthan is a top wedding destination, as it has royal palaces and forts brimming with grandeur. Though people are inviting fewer guests every year, according to My Shaadi Wale Wedding, they are focusing more on providing a high-quality, lavish, over-the-top affair to celebrate the joining of two families.

104. A Toilet Museum

Found in: New Delhi
Est. Cost: $0 entry fee*

Located in Delhi, this is certainly one of the world’s more unique museums. The Sulabh International Museum of Toilets is, as you may have guessed from the name, dedicated to the world history of toilets and sanitation. TIME named this museum, run by Sulabh International, one of the “weirdest,” least “mundane” museums in the world.

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The toilets displayed date back to medieval times, and the Mahavir Enclave institution has been visited by dignitaries from around the world. According to Sulabh, the museum’s main goal is to promote sanitation in India, a country where 344 million people do not have regular access to toilets. In 2020, the Indian government spent $30 billion on a plan to improve the country’s sanitation, but that plan has yet to be implemented. 

105. Bull Surfing

Found in: Anandapally, Kerala 
Est. Cost: $387* (Cost of a Bull in India)

This harvest sport race is common in Southern Kerala. In bull racing, two bulls, yoked together, are sent running down a paddy field full of ankle-deep water. Their handlers hang between them on a wooden plank, sliding through the muddy water. The first handler and bull group to the finish line wins.

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Bull surfing competitions can be lucrative, with landlords and local clubs offering cash prizes or trophies to lucky winners. There are even different prize categories, such as “speed” and “style.” The bulls are fed, trained, and groomed so that they look their best when it comes time to race.  

106. Asia’s First Glass Mosque

Found in: Laban, Shillong, Meghalaya 
Est. Cost: $257,653 to build*

The Madina Mosque holds the distinction of being the first glass mosque in India. This beautiful building is four stories high, and it cost nearly $300,000 to build. It serves the Sunni Muslims of Meghalaya, the largest Muslim community in the region. The Madina Masjid can accommodate 2,000 worshipers at a time.

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The glass minaret structure was a team effort, as it was funded by the local Muslim Union, as well as Christian and Hindu well-wishers. It is a major venue during Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr, and there are even rickshaws at the main bus stand that will take you directly to Safa Masjid.   

107. Highest Gold Consumption in the World

Found in: Nationwide 
Est. Cost: $60 billion per year*

India narrowly edged out China for the title of the world’s largest gold consumer. The country, which buys a lot of gold for weddings, buys 797.3 tonnes of gold per year (that’s nearly 1.8 million pounds every year). According to Investopedia, both India and China outpace other countries because their rituals and traditions require gold. Also, both countries have a high population.

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In India, one gram of gold costs around $60, which means a pound of gold costs $27,216. When you consider the fact that India has a GDP of $2,171 per capita, these figures are staggering and surprising. 

108. Ingenious Transportation Techniques

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: N/A

This picture is definitely an accident waiting to happen, as it shows an Indian transportation vehicle barely holding onto its cargo. When you look at photos like this, it shouldn’t surprise you that India is the top country in the world for road accident injuries and, sadly, deaths. Around 450,000 accidents happen in India every year.

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150,000 of those are fatal. There are 53 accidents an hour in the country, meaning that there is a death, on average, every four minutes. According to the Anadolu Agency, weak traffic law enforcement, bad road user behavior, and lack of rapid trauma care are the reasons the traffic situation in India is so bad. We think this photo falls under the category of “bad road user behavior.” 

109. Carpooling With the Kids

Found in: Somewhere in India 
Est. Cost: $400-$1,000* (Price of a Moped)

“Bad road user behavior,” as we just mentioned, is a huge cause of Indian traffic accidents. But, hey, you’ve got to get the kids to school somehow, right? This driver has managed to carpool several of his children onto one motorbike, and, hopefully, they aren’t traveling too quickly and the road isn’t too crowded.

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The population in India is 1.366 billion, so there’s no doubt that there are a lot of ingenious travel solutions like this around. The birth rate is 2.20 per woman, but that is a decline from the 1960s, when the average woman in India had six kids.

110. Konark’s Sun Temple

Found in: Konark, Odisha 
Est. Cost: $0.52-$7.73 entry fee* 

Located in Konark, Odisha, the Konark Sun Temple was constructed in the 1200s, and it is famous for its unique, intricate architecture. Its geometrical patterns, carved wheels, and other stone features serve as sundials in the temple. You can see three images of the Sun God, one at dawn, noon, and sunset, when the carving catches the light from different directions.

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Sadly, much of the Konark Sun Temple is in ruins, though, luckily, a lot of the iconography has survived. The blame for what destroyed the Temple has been a cause of conflict. Some believe the destruction was caused by natural damage, while others blame invading armies during the 1400s and 1600s.     

111. Bollywood

Found in: Mumbai, India 
Est. Cost: $1.79 billion* (Bollywood Gross Revenue Per Year)

Of course, we couldn’t have a list of unique Indian things without including Bollywood. Made from a combination of “Bombay” and “Hollywood,” Bollywood refers to the Hindi section of the Indian movie industry. Based in Mumbai, these movies are blockbuster hits. Bollywood grosses $1.79 billion every year in India.

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A lot of Bollywood films incorporate musical elements, and the script often includes song and dance. The plots are lengthy and often dramatic, and the musical numbers are nothing short of flamboyant. Some of the most famous Bollywood actors of all time are Aamir Khan, Shah Rukh Khan, Dharmendra, Anil Kapoor, Sridevi, and many more.

112. 32 Doctors in a Single Family

Found in: Jaipur 
Est. Cost: $258-$10,000* (MBBS Course Fee in India)

In this Jaipur family, there are not one, not two, but thirty-two doctors. Vinamrita Patni graduated from medical school in 2014, becoming the thirty-second member of the Patni family to become a doctor. Her parents, cousins, uncles, and aunts are all doctors. In the family, there are five gynecologists, seven physicians, three ophthalmologists, and three neurologists, ENT specialists, psychiatrists, urologists, surgeons, orthopedic doctors, and pathologists.

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According to Panti, there wasn’t any pressure on her to follow the family tradition, as she watched her parents dedicate themselves to helping the poor and sick. She said she was inspired to become a doctor by watching their example, never opting to even think about any other profession.

113. Tallest Statue in the World

Found in: Narmada, Gujarat 
Est. Cost: $422 million construction cost*

This statue, the Statue of Unity, stretches 597 feet into the sky, making it the tallest statue in the world. Unity depicts Vallabhbhai Patel, an independence activist and Indian statesman. Patel was the first home minister and deputy prime minister of India, and he was a devoted adherent of the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi.

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Construction began in 2013 at a total cost of $422 million. Five years later, it was inaugurated by Prime Minister Modi. The Statue of Unity is made from 7.4 million cubic feet of concrete and cement and 25,000 tons of steel. The outer façade is constructed of thousands of tons of bronze plates and cladding.    

114. World’s Largest School

Found in: Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 
Est. Cost: $500-$1,000* (Fees Per Year)

India is one of the world’s most populous nations, so it is not a surprise that it is home to the largest school in the world, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. City Montessori School has over 58,000 pupils. The school has eighteen campuses, five of which provide education up to the eighth grade.

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The private school was founded by two doctors, Jagdish and Bharti Gandhi. In 2002, their school won the UNESCO Prize for Peace Education, and the Dalai Lama has also given it the “Hope of Humanity” award. The total fees for this school are between $500 and $1,000 a year, depending on the grade level. 

115. 6 Seasons a Year

Found in: Nationwide for Hindus
Est. Cost: N/A 

While you might be used to four seasons a year, the Hindu calendar does things a little differently. There are 1.094 billion Hindus in India, and their calendar states that there are six seasons per year. These seasons include Vasant Ritu (Spring), Grishma Ritu (Summer), Varsha Ritu (Monsoon), Sharad Ritu (Autumn), Hemant Ritu (Pre-Winter), and Shita Ritu (Winter).

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Hindus in India and the rest of South Asia use these seasons to structure their lives. Hindu festivals and other important occasions take place in each of the six seasons, and this calendar has been around since the Vedic times (1,500-500 B.C.E.).  

116. Hawa Mahal

Found in: Jaipur 
Est. Cost: $58,832* (2006 Renovation Costs)

Located in Jaipur, this bright red and pink building, constructed from sandstone, is a major tourist attraction for those visiting India. The Hawa Mahal was built in 1799 by the grandson of the founder of Jaipur. The Mahal has five floors and it is similar to a honeycomb, with 953 small windows (Jharokhas) decorated with detailed latticework.

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The Hawa Mahal’s design allowed royal women to observe festivals and everyday life in Jaipur without being seen. They had to obey purdah, a strict rule that prevented them from leaving the house without a face covering. Though this honeycomb is one of the most photographed aspects of the Hawa Mahal, the feature is actually the back of the palace, not the front.   

117. Nature’s Toilet Café

Found in: Ahmedabad 
Est. Cost: $3-$10 per meal*

This Ahmedabad café is a big departure from regular cafes. Nature’s Toilet Café is a reverse food café. It serves finger foods, tea, and coffee, but the glasses are designed as toilets, as are the seats. Even the desserts come in toilet-shaped glasses. Whenever you use the Nature’s Toilet Café washroom, you get two rupees ($0.03).

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The real toilets in the washroom are connected to biogas, and these waste products create electricity to operate Nature’s Toilet Café. Much like the New Delhi Toilet Museum, Nature’s is dedicated to spreading awareness about good hygiene and good sanitation.    

118. Baby Tossing Week

Found in: Small Indian Villages Nationwide 
Est. Cost: N/A 

Technically, this practice is illegal under Indian children’s rights laws, and local officials claim they have not received reports of baby tossing for over a decade. Still, the New York Times describes it as a “30-foot plunge for good luck” that may still happen and go unreported.

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During the ritual, which occurs most frequently one week a year, infants under two are shaken by an Indian priest and then dropped 30-50 feet from a mosque or shrine. They are caught from below by relatives holding a hammock-like sheet. This practice is seven hundred years old, and, much of the time, it was practiced on ill babies to show trust in the almighty and curry favor with higher powers. 

119. World’s Highest Cricket Ground

Found in: Himachal Pradesh 
Est. Cost: N/A

The Chail Cricket Ground soars 7,000 feet above sea level, and it is located in Himachal Pradesh. It is encircled by a huge deodar, and Chail has been around since the late 1800s, when it was converted to an athletic field by Bhupinder Maharaja, the owner of a summer retreat in the area.

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The Chail Cricket Ground isn’t just used for India’s favorite sport. It is a school playground for the Chail Military School attendees, and, during school vacation, it is a polo field. There is also a neat basketball court and goal posts for soccer. The athletes have quite a task in front of them, as adjusting the oxygen conditions at that height is not easy.       

120. Dangerous Mountain Highways

Found in: Himalayan Mountains 
Est. Cost: N/A

There are quite a few dangerous mountain roads in India, the most perilous of which snake through the Himalayas, like this road. Often, these mountain passes are narrow, twisting and turning, and bad weather can set in at the drop of a hat.

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The Keylong Road, known as the Cliffhanger, is the most dangerous road in India. Holidify called it the “closest to death” that motorists will be while driving in India. Located between two Indian state borders, Keylong is 8,280 feet above sea level. The infamous road is not only sky-high, it is also narrow, in poor condition, and winding.

121. World’s Biggest Camel Fair

Found in: Ajmer, Rajasthan 
Est. Cost: $1,300* (Camel Price in India)

The Pushkar Camel Fair begins during Kartik, a Hindu calendar month, and ends five days later in late Kartik Purnima (late October/early November). The Camel Fair attracts 200,000 visitors to the Rajasthani town, and it is a very important pilgrimage destination for Hindus traveling to Pushkar Lake.

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The horse, cattle, and camel fair is a tourist attraction because, in addition to livestock trading, there are also cultural events and competitions such as dances, a tug of war, a “bridal competition, and a “largest mustache” contest. Camels also get in on the fun, as there is a camel race to kick off the Pushkar Fair.

122. Beautiful Bengal Tigers

Found in: Indian Subcontinent 
Est. Cost: N/A 

The Bengal Tiger is one of the largest wild cats in existence today. Males can weigh up to 570 pounds, and these tigers are native to India. Bengals have been present in the subcontinent since the Late Pleistocene Era. Now, 16,500 years later, these beautiful animals are endangered because of poaching and habitat destruction.

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The Bengal Tiger population is only around 2,500 today. Humans and tigers have proven incapable of coexisting, though tiger attacks on humans are far rarer than the opposite. India has named Bengal Tigers a protected species, though there are still issues with poaching that the government is fighting to address.     

123. The Cleanest Town in Asia

Found in: Mawlynnong, Meghalaya 
Est. Cost: $9.65 million* (Meghalaya Tourist Revenue)

Mawlynnong, located in Meghalaya, is the cleanest village in India. Mawlynnong has gained a reputation for its tidiness, and Discover India named it the most sanitary town in Asia. There are nine-hundred residents in the village, and the literacy rate is 90%. Pineapples, lychees, and betel nuts are the main crops of the Khasi people living there.

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The village, which holds to a matrilineal tradition, collects its waste in bamboo dustbins. That waste is then transferred to a pit and turned into manure. Smoking and polythene are banned, while rainwater harvesting is encouraged. Citizens are mandated to clean up the village, and this cleanliness has paid off. In 2017, the head of the village announced that tourism revenues had increased 60% as people came to see Asia’s tidiest town.

124. Militarized Chillies

Found in: Northeast India (Where Bhut Jolokia Is Grown)
Est. Cost: $5.15 per 2.2 pounds of ghost peppers* 

The bhut jolokia is the hottest chili pepper in the world, and just eating it as a regular civilian can cause immense pain, sweating, and all of the other unpleasant side effects that come from too-spicy food. The Ind