Saturday, April 8, 2023

A LITTLE BIT OF SMUT....................... NEVER HURT ANYONE ................................

 

I am not  sure about anyone else .....but i love  smut ....nasty shit ........ and  nakedness........ in all movies .........especially  european ...american movies  are   too hung up on sex .....europeans are more open .....on nakedness......... and more  secure ......on the whole sex  deal ........although amricans love violence over sex in movies  ....... not sure  why  .... but  ...... they will not  censor violence  but will a nipple  .....i think it goes   back to  that old pilgrim  ....brain washing .....god  fearing  ....circumcision shite ......that  they  still believe in  ........you  know the old  quaker  mentality .......have you seen  quaker  women ........fucking ugly ......that's enough to kill a  fucking boner on  any man ...........you never  hear of  quakers or  amish discos  .....no sir!!!!!!!! ......these women are wrapped tighter  than a sumo wrestlers  diaper  ....and probably the  same  smell .......not  that i would wanna  smell them....... or  a sumo wrestlers  diapers.......nope!!!!!!! ........anyways  for your pleasure .......in every  measure  ........here is a  shit load of  smut !!!!!! ......enjoy it  or not   ...as i always say .......


Controversial Movie Scenes That Crossed The Line

Today, hardly a day goes by where there is no controversy or public debate about whether or not various films or other programs have crossed a line of what is acceptable to depict on film. Such debates consume an enormous amount of the public’s collective consciousness, and it seems sometimes that it’s all we ever do. It is easy to forget, however, that such debates are as old as film itself.

Many films over the decades have been controversial for their depictions of various things. Excessive violence, sexual themes, and use of questionable language in films have been magnets for public debate around their suitability to be shown and whether or not they degrade society through their being shown. This list is a journey back in time and an examination of some films from yesterday that fit that description. 

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Happy Birthday, Lil Nas X! (Sunday, April 9th)Keep Watching
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'Onibaba' Remains One Of The Most Horrifying Films Of The 1960s


(Toho)
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Japanese cinema has always pushed the boundaries of conventional films, and has often been collectively a more avant-garde industry than the film industries of other countries. Onibaba, released in 1964, is a good example of this. The film is a period drama about the Samurai wars of medieval Japan, or a Jidaigeki as it is called in Japanese. The film was controversial when released, as it revolves around two women who capture and murder passing Samurai to steal their possessions to sell and survive, but one of the women ends up in a graphic sexual relationship with one of the Samurai they capture. 
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Sarah Kennedy's Performance In 'The Telephone Book' Was Too Raw For Audiences

(Rosebud Releasing Corporation)
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Sarah Kennedy’s performance in the 1971 film The Telephone Book is a prime example of a film controversially pushing the limits of acceptability. The film follows Kennedy, who plays a woman that receives obscene phone calls from various men. The film is an odd sort of comedy, as it features extensive fourth wall breaking and other aspects. It was received very badly at the time, due to its controversial content, but since has become more widely respected and lauded in film circles. 
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Swedish Actress Britt Ekland Turned Heads in 'The Wicker Man'

(British Lion Films)
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Horror films, by their very nature of trying to induce shock and terror in the viewing audience, have long been renowned for their ability to push the limits of what is deemed publicly acceptable on screen. The 1963 British horror movie The Wicker Man was no exception. It follows a missing girl on a remote Scottish island where the inhabitants have turned to ancient Celtic paganism rather than Christianity as the protagonist attempts to resuce the missing the girl, played by the pictured Britt Ekland. The film was lauded (and still is) as a colossus of horror movies. 

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Before 'Wonder Woman'... Lynda Carter In 'Bobbi Jo and the Outlaw'

(American International Pictures)
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Lynda Carter is most famous for her role as Wonder Woman, but it was not her feature film debut. That came a few months after the release of Wonder Woman in the film Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw. It follows Carter as a young, amateur country music singer, who escapes her life as a waitress and joins with Lyle, played by Marjoe Gortner, who fancies himself a modern day Billy the Kid. They are eventually joined by her sister and her boyfriend and embrace a life of crime. The film was notorious for some explicit scenes featuring Carter. 

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'A Clockwork Orange' Was Pulled From Theaters In The UK By Its Director, Stanley Kubrick

source: Warner Bros.
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Few directors have achieved the success and fame of Stanley Kubrick. Nearly all of his films have survived in the public imagination as critically acclaimed cult classic masterpieces. On his Mount Rushmore of films is A Clockwork Orange. Based on the novel by Anthony Burgess, it takes place in a dystopian Britain and follows a group of young delinquents who commit heinous acts of violence and rape. It’s popularity amongst young people and thereafter inspiration of copycat acts of violence similar to the film led to Kubrick going as far to request that the film be pulled from theatres in the United Kingdom. 
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'Beyond the Valley of the Dolls' Brought Exploitation Cinema To The Mainstream

(20th Century Fox)
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It is common for films viewed as controversial on release to be later appreciated and thereafter developed into cult classics among small but passionate fans. The 1970 film Beyond the Valley of the Dolls stands out as an example of this. The film follows an all-female band, one of whom is an heir to a large fortune, and their navigating the music industry amongst some less-then-upstanding characters they meet. The film was partially written by famed film critic Roger Ebert, and was controversial for its explicit violence and sexual content. 
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Behind The Scenes With Madeline Kahn and Mel Brooks on 'Blazing Saddles' (1974)

(Warner Bros.)
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Few comedy films have pushed the limits and maintained an absolutely iconic status in the way Mel Brook’s 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles has. The film has endured as a pillar of the comedy film genre ever since it’s release. It was thought to be controversial due to its crude use of language for jokes, particularly racial humor. During production, Brooks even said to the writers “Write anything you want because we’ll never be heard from again. We’ll all be arrested for this movie”. Ultimately, however Blazing Saddles was a massive success and has become an American classic. 
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Natalie Wood Gets A Little Too Groovy In 'Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice'

(Columbia Pictures)
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Controversial films often earn that distinction by examining concepts that are very much against societal norms. This picture shows Natalie Wood in the 1969 film Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, a picture that very much fits that bill. The film follows two couples, one of which rationalizes and begins to take part in extra-marital affairs. Eventually, the other couple comes around to the idea and the two couples switch partners, with some explicit scenes depicting it as such. Ultimately, the characters end up rejecting the idea and move on from it. 
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'Caligula'... The First Erotic Epic From Penthouse

(Analysis Film Releasing Corporation)
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Ancient Rome has long been a subject depicted on film to popular acclaim. However, few films did so as controversially and explicitly as 1979’s Caligula. The story follows the infamous Roman emperor Caligula, often regarded as one of the most brutal and unhinged historical figures. The film depicts the violence and sex of Caligula’s court in uncensored, explicit detail. The latter part of it’s depiction made it groundbreakingly controversial and famous, although it did not add up to making the film a compelling watch, as it was poorly reviewed. 
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Elizabeth Montgomery as the lead character in 'The Legend of Lizzie Borden' (1975)

(CBS Television Distribution)
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Murder mysteries are a genre whose popularity has remained consistent throughout the generations. Tales of murder often lend themselves to questions about ethics, revenge, justifiable violence, psychology, and so on, and can often be controversial in how they ask these questions as well as being quite explicit. The 1975 film The Legend of Lizzie Borden was an example of this. The film follows a still unsolved murder from the 1890’s in New England. The prime suspect was played by Elizabeth Montgomery, who was depicted committing the murders in the film while in the nude, which was censored for American viewers. 

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Girl Power in 'Faster, Pussycat Kill! Kill!'

(RM Films International)
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Some films that are viewed as distastefully controversial commentary in their time come to be greatly appreciated in retrospect. This is true of Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!, released in 1965. The film follows three female go-go dancers who plot to steal the buried hidden fortune of an old insane man who is protected by his young dim-witted son. The film has some very graphic scenes of violence, but was retrospectively acclaimed for it’s central premise of three independent female characters driving the plot. 
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Jamie Lee Curtis As The Ultimate Final Girl In 'Halloween'

(Compass Pictures Int)
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Halloween has long been a cliché setting within which to set a horror film. The apex of this notion is the 1978 classic Halloween starring Jamie Lee Curtis, as this picture shows, in her film debut, and others such as Michael Meyers. The film is lauded as a classic of the horror genre and was even selected by the Library of Congress as being worthy of special preservation. It was controversial at the time due to the sexual themes in the film, but has stood the test of time as being one of the better horror films ever made.  

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"Marriage functions best when both partners remain somewhat unmarried." -Italian actress Claudia Cardinale, 1966

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The behavior of celebrities has always been a cause for public debate and controversy on ethics and personal decisions due to the fact celebrity behavior is covered by tabloids and is always in the public eye. The public often loves nothing more than they do a celebrity scandal, particularly one regarding an affair. Sometimes, controversial statements on subjects like this from celebrities become hot button subjects of debate. This quote by the pictured actress Claudia Cardinale, justifying infidelity, is a great example thereof. 

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'Monty Python and the Holy Grail' (1975)

(EMI Films)
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Comedy and senses of humor change from generation to generation: often, something one generation finds hysterical will be found to be utterly boring by the next. Some films, however, stand the test of time and become classics of comedy. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is one such film that has never gone out of fashion. The film follows parodies of King Arthur and his court trying to find the illusive holy grail, and their adventures along the way. Since it’s release, it has secured a place on the Mount Rushmore of all-time comedies, but remains controversial to some due to it’s language and themes and the subjects it mocks. 

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Raquel Welch Courts Controversy In 'Myra Breckinridge'

(20th Century Fox)
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Gore Vidal was one of the most controversial and hot topic authors in American literature during the 20th century, and the films based on his novels inherited this. The 1970 comedy Myra Breckinridge was no exception. The film was immensely controversial for its depiction of highly explicit sexual content including rape, as well as its depiction and commentary on transgender issues. Although the novel was critically acclaimed, the film was largely regarded even outside of it’s controversial aspects as being a poorly made one.
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Is 'Possession' The Scariest Movie of All Time?

(Gaumont)
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European films have often taken more risks as far as addressing and portraying controversial topics or content than the American film industry has, and the pictured 1981 film Possession is no exception to this trend. Possession is a rather bizarre but well reviewed horror film that follows a woman who abruptly demands a divorce from her husband, who is a spy involved in the cold war in Berlin. It becomes increasingly more bizarre and horrific as the husband tries to figure out what her motives are and has many graphic horror, violent, and sexual scenes that made it quite controversial. 
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PJ Soles, Joey Ramone Goofing Around in between scenes in 'Rock N Roll High School'

(getty images)
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Music and what types of it are popular are often the most vivid, memorable and defining aspects of what separates different generations. The differences between generations and teenage or youth culture is a subject that many films have examined through the lens of music. This picture shows PJ Soles and Joey Ramone on the set of one such film, 1979’s Rock 'n' Roll High School. The film depicted late 1970’s and early 1980’s youth culture through the lens of contemporary music and touches heavily on young people versus established authority and other topics. 
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Peter Fonda Courts The Counter Culture in 'The Trip'

(American International Pictures)
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The counter-culture movement of the mid to late 1960’s generated no shortage of controversy. The use of psychedelic drugs such as LSD by the counter-cultural community was emblematic of this. The above pictured appropriately titled 1967 film The Trip examined the use of LSD and its effects. Written by the legendary Jack Nicholson and starring Peter Fonda, the film was immensely popular and well received for it’s depiction of the drug but quite controversial when it was released due to the fact it explored and promoted the drug at all. '

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Brooke Shields as a 12-Year-Old Prostitute In 'Pretty Baby'

(Paramount Pictures)
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It is a universally held principle that child exploitation and prostitution is among the most heinous and despicable of crimes, if not the most. The depiction of child prostitution in the 1978 film Pretty Baby, starring Brooke Shields as a 14-year-old prostitute, is for this reason one of the most controversial films ever made. The film depicts Shields as a young prostitute in early 20th century New Orleans explicitly, and it is not difficult to see why this film is viewed as nigh child pornography and slammed as such. Shields has stated she has no issue with the film, but it is still viewed in a negative light. 
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Audiences Are Still Scandalized By 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show'

(20th Century Fox)
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The Rocky Horror Picture Show is an example of a film that was controversial upon it’s release, but as social norms and standards have changed, has been re-examined as is now viewed retrospectively as a classic of the genre. The film is a bizarre horror-musical comedy mix that largely is a parody of the old-fashioned science fiction films of the 1930’s and 40’s, and deals with themes of sexuality and androgyny. In 2005, it was selected as worthy of special preservation by the library of congress due to it’s eventual status as a cult classic. 
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Sybil Danning Stuns In 'Chained Heat'

(Jensen Farley Pictures)
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Prison films and shows are an excellent way to examine the themes of authority, power, punishment, and exploitation. The setting of a prison and its straightforward hierarchy lends itself to such discussions. The 1983 pictured film Chained Heat examined these topics in the context of a women’s prison. It was controversial due to its depiction of sexual exploitation, drugs, and inter-prisoner race relations. It came under particular fire from lesbian activists, who felt it was far too stereotypical in its depictions. 
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The Graduate Shocked Audiences With Its Winter-Summer Romance

(Embassy Pictures)
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This picture shows Dustin Hoffmann and Anne Bancroft in the 1967 film The Graduate. The Graduate is widely considered one of the greatest American films ever made, but it’s immense acclaim and success upon release was not universal, as the plot was controversial. It follows Hoffman, who plays an uncertain college graduate, who begins an affair with an older married women but ultimately falls for her daughter instead. In the end, he runs off married with the daughter, and it ends with them questioning their impulsive decision. In later decades, the controversy around it has shifted more so towards viewing Bancroft’s character as predatory, but it is still lauded as a classic. 
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'99 Women' Earned An Early X-Rating

(Commonwealth United Entertainment)
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The above pictured and highly controversial film 99 Women is another example of how prison, especially women in prison can be used as a lens to examine the themes of hierarchy, sexuality, and so forth. 99 Women contained some very explicit sexual scenes to this end. However, unlike Chained Heat, the film was not well regarded, as it was viewed as explicit to no real end or purpose and although it achieved some financial success, it has none been particularly well remembered or preserved. 

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Jane Fonda Stuns In 'Barbarella'

(Paramount Pictures)
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1968’s Barbarella has endured as an example of a science fiction film, a genre that exploded in popularity during the late 1960’s and into the 1970’s and 1980’s, that has a female in the lead role. It follows the controversial actress Jane Fonda as an agent of earth who travels to another planet with the purpose of hunting down a villain with a weapon that could destroy the earth. The film garnered some controversy due to Fonda’s own controversial political positions and activism, as well as some of the sexual elements depicted in it. It was mildly successful, mostly in the United Kingdom. 
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'Bicycle Thieves' Earned Condemnation For a Few Shocking Scenes

(Ente Nazionale Industrie Cinematografiche)
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The Italian film industry has long punched above its weight in its export of critically acclaimed and controversial films. Its film industry is much more willing to take risks and push the limits of acceptability. Bicycle Thieves, released in 1948, is one such film. It is a neorealist film about a man who loses his bicycle that he needs to keep his job to support his family in the ruins of post war Italy. The cast was entirely first-time actors to make it as authentic as possible. It was controversial for its depiction of Italians and some graphic scenes but is in general lauded as one of the most influential films ever made for its impact on other directors. 
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'Black Sunday' Remains A Shocking Piece of Italian Horror

(Unidis)
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Witches and other traditional elements of folklore have long served as inspiration for horror films. The 1960 Italian horror picture Black Sunday tells the tale of a 17th century Moldavian witch who curses the descendants of her executioners and comes back to life centuries later. The film was controversial due to extremely graphic sexual and violence-based scenes. However, it is considered a pillar and foundational element of Italian gothic horror films and as such is remembered in high regard due it’s influence on future films. 
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Faye Dunaway Brings The Heat to the Very Bloody 'Bonnie and Clyde'

(Warner Bros.)
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Some films that are controversial in their time go on to open the proverbial gates for other films. The 1967 classic Bonnie and Clyde is emblematic of this process. The film follows the famed outlaws Bonnie and Clyde and their lives of crime and violence. It features several explicitly sexual themes and other scenes that have extensive and extremely graphic violence. The ending death scene became particularly infamous for its graphic nature. However, the success of the film showed studios films could be graphic and still successful. 
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'Cannibal Holocaust' is One Of the Few Horror Films That Was Actually Put On Trial

(United Artists Entertainment)
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Some films create and innovate a new style of filmmaking that makes them standout. The 1980 Italian film Cannibal Holocaust was the first major “found footage” film, that is essentially a film that seems as though it is discovered firsthand documentary footage. The film was incredibly controversial due it’s depictions of cannibalism, violence towards animals, and sexual assault. It was banned in Italy and the director was charged with obscenity. It has developed a following due to its innovative concept and the found footage style later gained fame in films such as The Blair Witch Project. 

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Pam Grier Is Truly Mighty In 'Coffy'

(American International Pictures)
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The civil rights movement of the 1960’s led to a boom in films that focused on black protagonists and commented on race relations. The 1973 film Coffy, starting the pictured Pam Grier, follows Grier as a nurse by day but vigilante by night trying to track down and kill the drug dealers responsible for getting her sister fatally hooked on drugs. She lures the drug dealers in by posing as a prostitute. The film was quite violent and explicit, and paved the way for more films to be made about black protagonists as it was quite successful. 
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Al Pacino's Turn As A Gay Hustler In 'Cruising' Made LGBTQ Audiences Furious

(United Artists)
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The latter half of the 20th century and increasing awareness and openness around LGBTQ issues opened up the possibility for films to be made about it. The 1980 film Cruising, starring the above pictured Al Pacino, follows a cop who goes undercover into New York City’s gay subculture to try and find a serial killer who has been murdering gay man. The film saw some success, but was heavily protested by the gay community for what was felt to be demeaning and stereotypical depictions

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'The Deer Hunter' Showed The Brutality Of The Vietnam War

(Universal Pictures)
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The Vietnam war, notorious for its brutality and horror, has been the subject of an immense number of films that seek to comment on war and the psychological effects of it. Few achieve this as deeply and transfixingly as 1978’s The Deer Hunter. It follows the experience of three soldiers captured by North Vietnam who are forced to play Russian roulette for the entertainment of their captors. Although successful and acclaimed, it was immensely controversial for it’s depiction of the North Vietnamese and the United States’ role in the war. 

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The Violence Of 'Django' Turned the Western Genre Upside Down





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